Autor Tópico: The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?  (Lida 18900 vezes)

0 Membros e 1 Visitante estão vendo este tópico.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 01:49:36 »
The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?

Professor Chris French is the Head of the  Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit  in the Psychology Department at Goldsmiths, University of London.  He is also a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the British False Memory Society.  His main current area of research is the psychology of paranormal beliefs and anomalous experiences. He frequently appears in the media casting a skeptical eye over paranormal claims. He edited The Skeptic magazine for more than a decade and sometimes writes for the Guardian’s online science pages.

Ever since records began, people have reported strange experiences that appear to contradict our conventional scientific understanding of the universe. These have included reports that appear to support the possibility of life after death, such as near-death experiences, ghostly encounters and apparent communication with the dead, as well as claims by various individuals that they possessed mysterious powers such as the ability to read minds, see into the future, obtain information from remote locations without the use of the known sensory channels, or to move objects by willpower alone.  Such accounts are accepted as veridical by most of the world’s population in one form or another and claims relating to miraculous healing, alien abduction, astrological prediction and the power of crystals are also accepted by many.  Belief in such paranormal claims is clearly an important aspect of the human condition. What are we to make of such accounts from a scientific perspective?

Should we accept at least some of these claims more or less at face value? That is to say, should we accept that extrasensory perception (ESP), psychokinesis (PK), and life after death are all real? Parapsychologists have systematically investigated such phenomena for around 130 years but have so far failed to convince the wider scientific community that this is the case. The eminent scientists and intellectuals who founded the Society for Psychical Research in 1882 were convinced that, with the tools of science at their disposal, they would settle the issue one way or another within a few years. Clearly, that has not happened. Instead, parapsychology has been characterised by a series of ‘false dawns’ during which it has been declared that at last a technique has been developed which can reliably show under well-controlled conditions that paranormal effects are real. With time, however, the technique falls out of favour as subsequent research fails to replicate the initially reported effects and methodological shortcomings become apparent.

The latest candidate for such a ‘false dawn’ is a series of relatively straightforward experiments reported by Daryl Bem in the prestigious Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  In eight of nine experiments, involving more than a thousand participants in total, Bem reported significant results suggesting that human beings are able in some way to sense events before they happen. For example, the study which produced the largest effect size appeared to show that participants are able to recall more words if they rehearse them than if they do not – even if the rehearsal does not take place until after recall has been tested! As so often happens, these controversial findings received widespread coverage in the mainstream science media. However, subsequent attempts at replication have failed, including a study involving three independent replication attempts carried by Richard Wiseman  (University of Hertfordshire), Stuart Ritchie (University of Edinburgh), and myself (Goldsmiths, University of London).

If paranormal forces really do not exist, how are we to explain the widespread belief in them and the sizeable minority of the population who claim to have had direct personal experience of paranormal phenomena? One possible answer is that there are certain events and experiences which may appear to involve paranormal phenomena but which can in fact be fully explained in non-paranormal, usually psychological, terms. This is the approach adopted by anomalistic psychologists. In general, anomalistic psychologists attempt to explain such phenomena in terms of known psychological effects such as hallucinations, false memories, the unreliability of eyewitness testimony, placebo effects, suggestibility, reasoning biases and so on. It is noteworthy that anomalistic psychologists have, in just a few decades, produced many examples of replicable effects that adequately explain a range of ostensibly paranormal phenomena.

Anomalistic psychology is definitely on the rise. Not only is it now offered as an option on many psychology degree programmes, it is also an option on the most popular A2 psychology syllabus in the UK.  Every year more books and papers in high quality journals are published in this area and more conferences and symposia relating to topics within anomalistic psychology are held. There is no doubt that anomalistic psychology is flourishing.

And what of parapsychology? The health of this discipline is somewhat harder to assess but apart from the occasional ray of hope offered by the latest false dawn, the situation does not look encouraging for parapsychologists. Funding for such research is inevitably more difficult to obtain in times of economic uncertainty. Scarce research funding will be invested in areas where the probability of success is high – and the history of parapsychology shows all too clearly that studies in this area often involve huge investments of time and resources and produce nothing in return. Without a genuine breakthrough in the near future, can parapsychology survive for much longer? Without psychic powers, it’s difficult to know but I certainly would not bet on it.

Vídeo: http://www.videojug.com/interview/anomalistic-psychology-2


fonte: http://blogs.nature.com/soapboxscience/2011/12/19/the-rise-of-anomalistic-psychology-%E2%80%93-and-the-fall-of-parapsychology

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #1 Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 01:52:04 »
Anomalistic Psychology

Chris French (Anomalistic Psychologist) gives expert video advice on: What is anomalistic psychology?; What is the difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology?; Is parapsychology a real science? and more...

What is anomalistic psychology?

Anomalistic psychology is essentially the psychology of paranormal beliefs and ostensibly paranormal experiences. So, most of the research is directed trying to come up with non-paranormal explanations for ostensibly paranormal experiences, and then see if we can find evidence to support those explanations.

What is the difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology?


The difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology is in terms of the aims of what each discipline is about. Parapsychologists typically are actually searching for evidence to prove the reality of paranormal forces, to prove they really do exist. So the starting assumption is that paranormal things do happen, whereas anomalistic psychologists tend to start from the position that paranormal forces probably don't exist and that therefore we should be looking for other kinds of explanations, in particular the psychological explanations for those experiences that people typically label as paranormal.

Is parapsychology a real science?

The question of whether or not Parapsychology is a real science is one that divides opinion sharply. Parapsychologist would insist that what they do is science. Many skeptics will see it as pseudo science. My personal opinion is that Parapsychology is a real science. Science isn't about a particular subject matter or content. It's about how you go about doing things. It's the method that's important. And as long as the Parapsychologist adopt the scientific method, whether or not paranormal forces exist is irrelevant. And if it meets that criteria, then Parapsychology is a science.

Do you believe in the paranormal?

Personally, I do not believe that Paranormal forces exist. But I'm certainly not so sure about that that I would say I know they definitely couldn't exist.On the basis of the evidence as I see it, I would bet money against it. But I would support Parapsychologists trying to find evidence that would convince me. So far that evidence isn't available.

Do you have to be a sceptic to be an anomalistic psychologist?


In practice, most people who describe themselves as anomalistic psychologists would also describe themselves as sceptics, but what they mean by sceptics is they are not actually dismissing these claims. They're saying show me the evidence; convince me. Scepticism in the proper sense is not about dismissal. It's about doubt, but being open to the possibility that you are wrong and that they other guy's correct.

Why do you think your work is important?

The reason I'm so fascinated by Anomalistic Psychology and Parapsychology is because most people in opinion poll after opinion poll actually believe in this stuff and a sizeable minority of them actually claim direct personal experiences of the paranormal. So, were there a situation that, where any claim from seeing a ghost, to experiencing telepathy, to even being abducted by aliens. There's a huge proportion of the population that actually believe in this stuff. Now, either that means that paranormal forces are real, if they are we should take that on board, accept it, and the wider scientific community should try and study those forces or alternatively, it's telling something very important about human psychology. So, either way it's worth taking those claims seriously.

What does a typical day involve for you?

A typical day for me as with anyone else working in a University will be divided between research, teaching, and admin. I will say nothing more about the admin. The teaching I enjoy thoroughly because anomalistic psychology not only really hooks the students in but it's a great tool to actually teach them the basic skills of critical thinking. Why some kinds of evidence should be given more weight than other kinds of evidence and it's also great fun. On the research side then the research will vary from setting up studies where we'll compare groups of people who believe in the paranormal with groups of people who don't believe in the paranormal in terms of how they interpret information, how they remember information, personality characteristics and so on and so forth. In an attempt to understand why some people seem to be prone to believing in the paranormal and some don't. On top of that there may well be media events, etcetera, etcetera, public education, so the day can be very, very varied there's no straight routine, but apart from the admin then I enjoy most of it.

What abilities do you need?

Other than the abilities that you need to be either a nomalistic psychologist or a parapsychologist. Basically, a respect for scientific method and the ability to handle qualitative and quantitative data. A lot of that will involve being able to understand and carry out statistical analysis, to know about experimental design, to know about how to test these kinds of claims properly. If you are a parapsychologist, you have a set of experiments that would rule out any non-paranormal explanations for any findings you may obtain. If you are a nomalistic psychologist, again you need to understand experimental design and be able to control for any confounding factors, and so on and so forth. And at the end of the day you'll be able to draw stronger conclusions from your results and hopefully be able to convince people that your hypothesis was correct.

Thanks for watching the interview Anomalistic Psychology For more how to videos, expert advice, instructional tips, tricks, guides and tutorials on this subject, visit the topic Ghosts.

http://www.videojug.com/interview/anomalistic-psychology-2

Offline Geotecton

  • Moderadores Globais
  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 25.703
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #2 Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 06:36:11 »
The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
[...]

Se não conseguiram uma só boa evidência em 129 anos de pesquisas, para que continuar insistindo?
Foto USGS

Offline parcus

  • Nível 32
  • *
  • Mensagens: 2.215
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #3 Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 07:00:26 »
Chris French (Anomalistic Psychologist) gives expert video advice on: What is anomalistic psychology?; What is the difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology?; Is parapsychology a real science? and more...Is parapsychology a real science?

The question of whether or not Parapsychology is a real science is one that divides opinion sharply. Parapsychologist would insist that what they do is science. Many skeptics will see it as pseudo science. My personal opinion is that Parapsychology is a real science. Science isn't about a particular subject matter or content. It's about how you go about doing things. It's the method that's important. And as long as the Parapsychologist adopt the scientific method, whether or not paranormal forces exist is irrelevant. And if it meets that criteria, then Parapsychology is a science.
Essa realmente é uma visão bem boba de ciência, como o estudo de algo que não existe pode ser considerado ciência só porque usa o "método científico"? Não é óbvio que teorias que dizem que algo é "paranormal" (e consequentemente não real) são falsas?
http://tomwoods.com . Venezuela, pode ir que estamos logo atrás.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #4 Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 10:34:40 »
Chris French (Anomalistic Psychologist) gives expert video advice on: What is anomalistic psychology?; What is the difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology?; Is parapsychology a real science? and more...Is parapsychology a real science?

The question of whether or not Parapsychology is a real science is one that divides opinion sharply. Parapsychologist would insist that what they do is science. Many skeptics will see it as pseudo science. My personal opinion is that Parapsychology is a real science. Science isn't about a particular subject matter or content. It's about how you go about doing things. It's the method that's important. And as long as the Parapsychologist adopt the scientific method, whether or not paranormal forces exist is irrelevant. And if it meets that criteria, then Parapsychology is a science.
Essa realmente é uma visão bem boba de ciência, como o estudo de algo que não existe pode ser considerado ciência só porque usa o "método científico"? Não é óbvio que teorias que dizem que algo é "paranormal" (e consequentemente não real) são falsas?

Tenho a impressão que foi uma resposta politicamente correta de quem atua numa área "anomalista" e que, por causa disso, tem que conviver com parapsicólogos. Além disso, existem cientistas que se dizem parapsicólogos mas adotam a mesma abordagem da psicologia anomalistica. Richard Wisemann e Susan Blackmore já foram considerados parapsicólogos, mas sempre desenvolveram estudos de psicologia anomalística como French conceitua. Também me parece a conceituação de uma "psicologia anomalistica" é uma grande manobra de diferenciação para se livrar do estigma do caráter pseudocientífico da parapsicologia.

O mais importante é a abordagem.

"The difference between anomalistic psychology and parapsychology is in terms of the aims of what each discipline is about. Parapsychologists typically are actually searching for evidence to prove the reality of paranormal forces, to prove they really do exist. So the starting assumption is that paranormal things do happen, whereas anomalistic psychologists tend to start from the position that paranormal forces probably don't exist and that therefore we should be looking for other kinds of explanations, in particular the psychological explanations for those experiences that people typically label as paranormal."

Offline gogorongon

  • Nível 30
  • *
  • Mensagens: 1.834
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Não.
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #5 Online: 22 de Janeiro de 2012, 18:29:09 »
É tudo culpa daqueles jovens, e daquele cachorro.

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #6 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 10:15:14 »
The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
[...]

Se não conseguiram uma só boa evidência em 129 anos de pesquisas, para que continuar insistindo?

Há várias evidências excelentes: médiuns e psíquicos que nunca foram pegos em fraude, casos de reencarnação, testes ganzfeld comprovadores de telepatia, eqms etc.

Offline D|V

  • Nível 20
  • *
  • Mensagens: 650
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Livre pensador
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #7 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 10:47:01 »
The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
[...]

Se não conseguiram uma só boa evidência em 129 anos de pesquisas, para que continuar insistindo?

Há várias evidências excelentes: médiuns e psíquicos que nunca foram pegos em fraude, casos de reencarnação, testes ganzfeld comprovadores de telepatia, eqms etc.

Adoraríamos saber mais detalhes sobre esses casos. Você pode ser mais específico?


Offline Geotecton

  • Moderadores Globais
  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 25.703
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #9 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 13:30:13 »
Adoraríamos saber mais detalhes sobre esses casos. Você pode ser mais específico?

Posso:

Médiuns e psíquicos

a) Leonora Piper: http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2011/a-sra-piper-1899-1900/ ; http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2011/livro-gratuito-madame-piper-e-a-sociedade-anglo-americana-de-pesquisas-psquicas-de-michael-sage/

b) Gladys Osborne Leonard: http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2011/o-caso-bobbie-new-love-1935/

c) Stefan Ossowieski: http://www.amazon.com/World-Grain-Sand-Clairvoyance-Ossowiecki/dp/0786421126

Reencarnação

a) http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2012/trs-novos-casos-do-tipo-reencarnao-no-sri-lanka-com-registros-escritos-feitos-antes-das-verificaes-1988/

b) http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2012/replicao-de-estudos-de-casos-sugestivos-de-reencarnao-por-trs-investigadores-independentes-1994/

Ganzfeld (telepatia)

a) http://www.psy.unipd.it/~tressold/cmssimple/uploads/includes/MetaFreeResp010.pdf

EQM

a) http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2011/uma-experincia-de-quase-morte-estudada-prospectivamente-com-percepes-corroboradas-fora-do-corpo-e-cura-inexplicada/

E qual(is) deste(s) link(s) é(são) o resultado de um ensaio que foi publicado como artigo revisado em uma revista científica de primeira linha?

E qual(is) dele(s) foi(ram) submetido(s) à replicação de testes com resultados semelhantes, feito por pesquisadores independentes?
Foto USGS

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #10 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 13:56:52 »

E qual(is) deste(s) link(s) é(são) o resultado de um ensaio que foi publicado como artigo revisado em uma revista científica de primeira linha?

E qual(is) dele(s) foi(ram) submetido(s) à replicação de testes com resultados semelhantes, feito por pesquisadores independentes?

Quase todos. Apenas dois são livros. O restante foi publicado em revistas científicas. A Society for Psychical Research e seu jornal, o Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, possuíam diversos membros da Royal Society entre eles, como Oliver Lodge - o primeiro a publicar um artigo sobre telepatia na Nature - e Charles Richet. Inclusive as pesquisas nos Proceedings sobre a médium Piper foram citadas na Enciclopédia Britânica de 1911. Vários cientistas replicaram os resultados, como William James, de Harvard.

Quanto às pesquisas de reencarnação, o artigo de 1988 foi publicado em duas revistas, sendo uma delas do mainstream científico, o Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases (JNMD). A publicação no JNMD foi no formato de Short Communication ou Brief Communication ou ainda Brief Report (artigo curto). Segundo Volpato em seu livro “Publicação Científica” (2008), isso quer dizer que o artigo defende uma ideia original, porém sem se aprofundar no fenômeno. Pode reportar algum efeito, sem que consiga mostrar os mecanismos determinantes. É uma publicação mais rápida, mas cujo grau de novidade deve ser grande. Como o próprio nome diz, a idéia básica é a de uma comunicação curta, mas de algo muito interessante. Já o artigo de 1994 trata justamente da questão da replicação por autores independentes, inclusive por uma antropóloga de Harvard.

A pesquisa sobre ganzfeld foi publicada no Psychological Bulletin, uma revista do mainstream de alto fator de impacto.

O caso de EQM foi publicado na única revista do mundo dedicada exclusivamente às eqms, que é revisada por pares, e teve como editor por anos Bruce Greyson, um dos maiores pesquisadores da área.

Offline Osler

  • Nível 25
  • *
  • Mensagens: 1.115
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #11 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 14:40:35 »
EQM

a) http://obraspsicografadas.haaan.com/2011/uma-experincia-de-quase-morte-estudada-prospectivamente-com-percepes-corroboradas-fora-do-corpo-e-cura-inexplicada/

Li esse link, já que foi da área onde já pesquisei.
Um relato anedótico de uma experiência extra-corpórea em um paciente em coma, mas sem parada cardio-respiratória.  Apresentava inclusive reflexo pupilar no evento, provável atividade cerebral no momento do evento *1
O paciente não conseguiu acertar a codificação visual, relatou palavras que não foram ditas por um médico que o examinou interpretando-as com outras significação *2
Nada do relato não pode ser explicado por meios do conhecimento cerebral moderno, apesar da experiÊncia me parecer bem vívida.
Há relato de melhora da lesão prévia, com uma mão em garra melhorando *3 mas sem confirmação por comparação clínica ou por exames complementares *4

Meu comentário:  Assim como vários outros relatos, falta a esse dados que realmente corroborem a EQM.  É conhecido que apesar dos pacientes terem relatos muito vívdos do que acontece, o que as pessoas falam, quem aparece (pai, mãe, Jesus) ninguém nunca olha para a codificação visual.  Isso sempre me frustrou quando pesquisei EQM.

*1 Não houve monitorização eletroencefalográfica no momento da descrição, não é descrito os outro achados do exame neurológico, nem é explicitado se o paciente tinha drive respiratório.  Não se pode caracterizar que o cérebro não estivesse em funcionamento, condição sine qua non para as postulações e questrionamentos advindos das experiências de  Quase-Morte.

*2 A pesquisa do reflexo pupilar não é " um sinal de vida", nem se presta para isso, nem foi o dito pelo médico que realizou o exame.  Assimetria do reflexo pupilar tem outra significância médica

*3 Pelo relatado parece ser um problema de hipertonia muscular (piramidalismo) que é passível de melhora após dano cerrebral

*4 Não há relato de exame neurológico feito antes e depois (!) do evento, apenas a "impressão" do paciente.  Também não há relato de ENMG ou Imagem no antes/após
“Como as massas são inconstantes, presas de desejos rebeldes, apaixonadas e sem temor pelas conseqüências, é preciso incutir-lhes medo para que se mantenham em ordem. Por isso, os antigos fizeram muito bem ao inventar os deuses e a crença no castigo depois da morte”. – Políbio

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #12 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 15:08:41 »
Oi, Franciscodog

bons comentários, mas parece-me que você exagerou com relação a esse ponto: "Há relato de melhora da lesão prévia, com uma mão em garra melhorando mas sem confirmação por comparação clínica ou por exames complementares"

São descritas algumas confirmações por notas médicas e fisoterápicas:

A extensão do atrofiamento não havia sido avaliada, nem documentada formalmente antes da EQM. Entretanto, uma tala tinha sido feita para a mão do paciente pelo departamento de utensílios do hospital vários anos antes da atual admissão hospitalar. O paciente indicou que a tala não tinha sido eficaz e que sua mão permanecia atrofiada. As notas médicas e fisioterápicas foram examinadas para verificar se a fisioterapia extensiva havia sido realizada em sua mão; não havia nenhum registro de sessões desse tipo no histórico dele. Entretanto, documentou-se nas notas da fisioterapia que havia um aumento de tônus muscular em sua mão atrofiada antes da alta hospitalar. Isto foi discutido com o fisioterapeuta, que explicou que a mão provavelmente não abriria sem uma operação para liberar os tendões que tinham estado atrofiados naquela posição por 60 anos. Nenhuma operação foi feita. Permanece inexplicado o fato de que agora o paciente pode abrir e usar a mão que antes era atrofiada.

Não há razões para desacreditar as afirmações do paciente e de sua irmã a respeito da extensão do atrofiamento antes da EQM. Na verdade, o fato deste atrofiamento ter sido curado foi mencionado apenas quando o paciente interpretou mal uma das perguntas feitas durante uma entrevista aprofundada que foi feita posteriormente. Não tivesse ele compreendido mal a pergunta, o fato de que agora ele é capaz de abrir a mão permaneceria desconhecido.


Ninguém tem que abandonar a crença materialista por causa deste caso, mas eu diria que ele merece ser visto com grande respeito, ou seja, como uma possibilidade real de que estamos diante de uma anomalia enorme ... e há casos melhores, como o de Pam Reynolds ou Al Sullivan... no final deste artigo são citadas referências para outros casos do tipo.

Offline parcus

  • Nível 32
  • *
  • Mensagens: 2.215
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #13 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 15:47:48 »
Não deve ser visto com respeito não, "não sei, mas você não consegue explicar a minha estorinha, por isso eu sei que estou certo" não justifica nenhuma teoria metafísica.
http://tomwoods.com . Venezuela, pode ir que estamos logo atrás.

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #14 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 16:45:00 »
O progresso científico começa com uma observação que não pode ser explicada por modelos existentes. Acontecimentos inexplicados são informados  regularmente na literatura médica, sendo um substrato valioso para a pesquisa. Os relatórios desse tipo, portanto, merecem atenção, e não um encaixe procusteano em paradigmas correntes. Muito menos o desprezo dos céticos.

Offline Osler

  • Nível 25
  • *
  • Mensagens: 1.115
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #15 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 16:58:08 »
Enfant, como você bem salientou, a única descrição é um relato do fisioterapêuta que refere hipertonia importante.  Não foi feito uma avaliação neurofisiológica no antes, nem um teste terapêutico com relaxante muscular oral ou local (botox por exemplo). 
Há apenas o relato no pós que o paciente refere melhora, onde infere-se que houve melhora da espasticidade/hipertonia, percebida pelo paciente.  Novamente nenhuma avaliaçaõ neurofisiológica que comprove essa melhora.
A menos que alguém queira demostrar que os tendões "esticaram" independentes do tônus muscular não há nada de fantástico nessa "cura".

Quanto aos outros relatos, por favor pode me enviar, como lhe já militei na área.  Apesar de atualmente não me atualizar constantemente tenho lido esporadicamente todos os artigos que eventualmente tenho acesso. E até agora nenhum é consistente.

Esse caso particularmente que você citou é bastantequestionável, principalmente pelo status neurológico do paciente durante o estudo.
“Como as massas são inconstantes, presas de desejos rebeldes, apaixonadas e sem temor pelas conseqüências, é preciso incutir-lhes medo para que se mantenham em ordem. Por isso, os antigos fizeram muito bem ao inventar os deuses e a crença no castigo depois da morte”. – Políbio

Offline D|V

  • Nível 20
  • *
  • Mensagens: 650
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Livre pensador
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #16 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 17:18:56 »
O progresso científico começa com uma observação que não pode ser explicada por modelos existentes. Acontecimentos inexplicados são informados  regularmente na literatura médica, sendo um substrato valioso para a pesquisa. Os relatórios desse tipo, portanto, merecem atenção, e não um encaixe procusteano em paradigmas correntes. Muito menos o desprezo dos céticos.

Com isso eu concordo. Infelizmente me falta gabarito técnico pra ler estes textos e comentar decentemente, mas uma coisa é bem visível : se tais fenômenos (como estes que você postou, clarividência, EQM, médiuns) fossem realmente verdadeiros, já não eram pra ser encarados como um algo real, com existência indiscutível?

Eu sei que cientifica e filosoficamente falando a verdade absoluta é algo que, se existe, deve ser inalcançável, e qualquer teoria está sempre aberta pra debates, pode ser refutada ou reafirmada, mas por exemplo, a gravidade existe, é algo indiscutível, fechar os olhos e não acreditar não te permite sair flutuando por aí, embora ainda não tenhamos uma resposta definitiva (ou o mais perto disso) sobre O QUE É a gravidade, fato que não impede de afirmar que ela existe. O mesmo não deveria poder ser dito de tais fenômenos "meta"físicos? Já são mais de cem anos de ciência séria (estou sendo modesto), e relatos e estudos sobre essa enorme gama de fenômenos "para"normais são tão antigas quanto, então porque até hoje não existe nenhum desses fenômenos sobre o qual você possa afirmar "Isso existe, está aqui todas as provas, todos os estudos, vídeos, documentação, aplicações práticas etc)"? (ou existe, e eu que estou desatualizado?

Artigos em alguns sites, legal, cientistas afirmando que é fato, maneiro, algumas publicações em periódicos científicos, tranquilo, só não esqueçamos que artigos podem ser escritos por qualquer um, bem como sites também, cientistas também são humanos, possuem suas crenças, convicções, desejos, e não estão isentos de mentir, interpretar resultados erroneamente, ou até trapacear, pra tentar validar alguma teoria sua, e uma publicação num periódico científico não significa que a teoria seja verdadeira e totalmente a prova de refutações.

Vamos pegar a telepatia, por exemplo. Se de fato fosse um fenômeno real, ainda que não soubéssemos como funciona, não deveria ter uma abundância de provas e mais provas? Me diga se você conhece um só estudo sério, que tenha sido realizado em centros de pesquisa de renome, por cientistas cujo currículo seja coroado com contribuições e pesquisas de mérito, que tenha sido revisado em vários lugares do mundo, que tenha tido seus resultados publicados em diversos sites e publicações ao redor do mundo, enfim, que tenha passado pelo maior escrutínio científico possível.
Com certeza um fenômeno tão fantástico quanto a comunicação direta entre mentes seria algo que, se descoberto, renderia tudo isso aí que eu falei. Que centro de pesquisa, e que cientista no mundo, não iria querer participar de uma pesquisa dessas? Seria preciso somente uma pessoa com essa habilidade pra desencadear esse tipo de reação na comunidade científica.

No entanto, quando você vai pesquisar sobre esse tipo de assunto, só o que se acha é milhares de sites tão ridículos que são descartados de primeira, alguns que até levam o assunto a sério, mas carecem de fontes fidedignas, talvez um livro ou dois falando sobre assuntos e contando casos (que na maior parte das vezes não passam de evidências anedóticas), volta e meia uma pesquisa realizada em algum centro de pesquisa pró-(insira aqui o fenômeno), mas que no fim das contas traz apenas alguns resultados que não comprovam nada, talvez alguns dados interpretadores equivocadamente, mais raro ainda uma publicação num meio mais confiável, embora com tão escassas evidências que não são suficientes pra render uma matéria de capa (algo que telepatia deveria ser capaz de conseguir).

Não vou aqui afirmar se existe ou não, só que a minha posição atual é de que nenhum desses fenômenos seja algo verdadeiro.

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #17 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 18:12:40 »
Quanto aos outros relatos, por favor pode me enviar, como lhe já militei na área.  Apesar de atualmente não me atualizar constantemente tenho lido esporadicamente todos os artigos que eventualmente tenho acesso. E até agora nenhum é consistente.

Um trecho do artigo publicado na revista OMEGA, Vol. 40(4) 513-519, 1999-2000, "CAN EXPERIENCES NEAR DEATH FURNISH EVIDENCE OF LIFE AFTER DEATH?*"

O primeiro caso foi investigado pelo Dr. Michael Sabom, um cardiologista em Atlanta (Sabom, 1998). Neste caso, em agosto de 1991, a paciente, Pam Reynolds (pseudônimo), passou por um procedimento radical, envolvendo uma parada cardíaca completamente induzida, profunda hipotermia, e proteção cerebral com barbitúricos para a remoção cirúrgica de um gigante aneurisma de artéria basilar (Spetzler et al., 1988; Williams, Rainer, Fieger, Murray, & Sanchez, 1991). No momento em que o aneurisma foi removido, a temperatura no interior do corpo da Srta. Reynolds era de 60 graus Fahrenheit, seu coração estava parado, um eletroencefalograma (EEG) mostrava uma ausência de atividade de ondas cerebrais, não havia resposta da base (incluindo auditiva) cerebral, e todo o sangue havia sido drenado de seu cérebro. A Srta. Reynolds relatou que logo após a cirurgia ter começado, ela ouviu um zumbido, sentiu-se deixando o corpo, e então estava assistindo a cirurgia como se estivesse assentada nos ombros do cirurgião. Em especial, ela descreveu acuradamente o incomum boné que vira o neurocirurgião usando e algumas observações feitas pelo cardiologista. Detalhes do que ela descreveu fora subsequentemente confirmados tanto pelas anotações pós-operatórias do neurocirurgião como do cardiologista. Além desta experiência fora do corpo, que ocorreu no início do procedimento cirúrgico, a Srta. Reynolds também relatou vivenciar muitos outros aspectos freqüentemente citados em EQM, inclusive um vórtice semelhante a um túnel, uma luz forte muito incomum, e a presença de vários entes amados já falecidos, que falaram com ela e a mandaram de volta para o corpo. Estas características de sua experiência parecem ter ocorrido próximo do momento em que o aneurisma foi removido, quando a parada cardíaca completa e a supressão da atividade do EEG ocorreram. Além disto, neste momento – um momento em que ela poderia, por todos os critérios técnicos ser considerada “morta” – a Srta. Reynolds estava “o mais consciente que penso jamais ter estado em toda minha vida”.
    O segundo caso foi investigado por um de nós (B.G.) e foi relatado por nós em mais detalhes em outra obra (Cook, Greyson, & Stevenson, 1998). O paciente, Al Sullivan, relatou que, durante uma operação de emergência de desvio quádruplo em 1998, ele pareceu estar fora de seu corpo e assistir a cirurgia em curso. Um dos cirurgiões pareceu estar “batendo seus braços como se tentasse voar”. Tanto o cirurgião e o cardiologista neste caso confirmaram para B.G. que o cirurgião havia feito estes movimentos estranhos durante a operação. O Doutor explicou que para evitar que suas mãos tocassem qualquer superfície entre o tempo em que ele “esfrega as mãos” e o tempo em que ele começa a cirurgia, ele criou o hábito de segurar suas mãos contra seu peito e apontar com seus cotovelos para dar instruções para as outras pessoas na sala de operação.O cardiologista confirmou que o Sr. Sullivan havia descrito este comportamento incomum para ele logo após recuperar a consciência, depois da cirurgia. Como no caso da Srta. Reynolds, a EQM de Sr. Sullivan também incluiu muitos outros aspectos, como viajar por um espaço escuro, ver um túnel e uma luz forte incomum, e encontrar entes queridos já falecidos.
    Algumas pessoas podem objetar que em ambos os casos (diferentemente do caso da Sra. Gaines) os acontecimentos verificáveis descritos aconteceram na sala de cirurgia e portanto dentro do alcance sensorial normal do paciente. Alguns deles relatam vivenciarem sensações auditivas enquanto sob efeito de anestesia geral, embora estes casos pareçam raros (Moerman, Bonke, & Costing, 1993; Trustman, Dubovsky, & Titley, 1977). Entretanto, nestes casos e nos outros, os processos auditivos normais como a fonte do conhecimento do paciente parecem estar excluídos. (Para uma discussão da percepção auditiva persistente como uma explicação para EQM em geral, ver Sabom, 1982.) Tanto a Srta. Reynolds como o Sr. Sullivan descreveram ocorrências visuais que não podiam ter sido percebidas ou inferidas por meios auditivos: a Srta. Reynolds descreveu o aparecimento do incomum boné visto usado pelo seu cirurgião, o Sr. Sullivan descreveu os estranhos movimentos feitos por seu cirurgião. Além disto, as orelhas da Srta. Reynolds estavam tampadas por pequenos alto-falantes inseridos em seus ouvidos para monitorar o centro nervoso auditivo em sua base cerebral. (As respostas de suas bases auditivas e cerebrais estavam ausentes durante a remoção do aneurisma, mas não no momento em que o neurocirurgião começou a fazer cortes dentro de seu crânio, ou no momento em que o cardiologista fez as observações que a paciente relatou ter ouvido.)
    Casos como estes, nos quais a afirmação da pessoa de ter percebido acontecimentos inacessíveis a seus sentidos físicos têm sido confirmados e verificados, são ainda muito raros; mas acreditamos que casos que tenham todas as três características que descrevemos poderiam oferecer evidência sugestiva da sobrevivência da consciência após a morte, se novos casos puderem ser encontrados e adequadamente investigados logo após ocorrerem. De particular importância também seria a identificação e investigação de mais casos como o de Pam Reynolds, no qual uma atividade sensorial e cognitiva complexa e clara parecia estar ocorrendo quando praticamente toda a atividade cerebral havia cessado. Enfatizamos, no entanto, que EQM podem oferecer somente indireta evidência da continuação da consciência após a morte: porque as pessoas que vivenciaram estas experiências viveram para relatá-las, portanto elas não estavam mortas, embora pudessem estar próximas desta condição. Entretanto, EQM do tipo que descrevemos, juntamente com outros tipos de experiências sugerindo sobrevivência após a morte (ver, e.g., Gauld, 1982; Stevenson, 1987; Stevenson, 1997), oferecem convergente evidência que garante o fato de podermos levar a sério a idéia de que a consciência pode sobreviver à morte.

Offline Enfant Terrible

  • Nível 10
  • *
  • Mensagens: 103
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #18 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 18:21:53 »
Com isso eu concordo. Infelizmente me falta gabarito técnico pra ler estes textos e comentar decentemente, mas uma coisa é bem visível : se tais fenômenos (como estes que você postou, clarividência, EQM, médiuns) fossem realmente verdadeiros, já não eram pra ser encarados como um algo real, com existência indiscutível?

Na Enciclopédia Britânica de 1911 os poderes paranormais da médium Piper foram considerados como algo indiscutível.

Eu sei que cientifica e filosoficamente falando a verdade absoluta é algo que, se existe, deve ser inalcançável, e qualquer teoria está sempre aberta pra debates, pode ser refutada ou reafirmada, mas por exemplo, a gravidade existe, é algo indiscutível, fechar os olhos e não acreditar não te permite sair flutuando por aí, embora ainda não tenhamos uma resposta definitiva (ou o mais perto disso) sobre O QUE É a gravidade, fato que não impede de afirmar que ela existe.

Será?

http://astropt.org/blog/2010/07/13/gravidade-e-uma-ilusao/

Vamos pegar a telepatia, por exemplo. Se de fato fosse um fenômeno real, ainda que não soubéssemos como funciona, não deveria ter uma abundância de provas e mais provas? Me diga se você conhece um só estudo sério, que tenha sido realizado em centros de pesquisa de renome, por cientistas cujo currículo seja coroado com contribuições e pesquisas de mérito, que tenha sido revisado em vários lugares do mundo, que tenha tido seus resultados publicados em diversos sites e publicações ao redor do mundo, enfim, que tenha passado pelo maior escrutínio científico possível.

Uma das primeiras dessas experiências foi publicada em 1965 na revista Science. Esse estudo relatava que os eletroencefalogramas (EEGs) de alguns pares separados de gêmeos idênticos (dois pares em um conjunto de 15 pares testados) demonstravam correspondências inesperadas. Quando era pedido a um gêmeo ou gêmea que fechasse os olhos, o que faz com que os ritmos alfa do cérebro aumentem, os ritmos alfa do gêmeo correspondente, distante daquele, também aumentaram, segundo os registros. O mesmo efeito não foi observado em pares de pessoas não relacionadas dessa forma. Esse artigo gerou uma onda de dez réplicas conceituais, efetuadas por oito grupos diferentes em todo o mundo. Dos dez estudos, oito reportaram resultados positivos. Um destes foi publicado na revista Nature, enquanto a outra apareceu na revista conservadora Behavioral Neuropsychiatry. Uma década mais tarde, o psicofisiologista Jacobo Grinberg-Zylberbaum e seus colegas da Universidade Nacional Autônoma, no México, relataram uma série de estudos em que alegavam ter detectado respostas cerebrais simultâneas nos EEGS de pares de pessoas estudadas em separado. Um desses estudos foi publicado na revista científica Physics Essays, estimulando outra onda de tentativas de replicação. Em 2003, uma repetição foi realizada com sucesso e relatada na revista Neuroscience Letters pelo especialista em EEG Jiri Wackermann e seus colegas. Eles tentaram fechar todos os “furos” conhecidos que haviam sido identificados nos estudos anteriores e aplicaram um método analítico sofisticado aos dados resultantes da gravação das ondas cerebrais. A equipe de Wackermann concluiu que:
 
Estamos enfrentando um fenômeno que nem é fácil de descartar como falha metodológica ou artefato técnico, nem em ser entendido em sua natureza. Nenhum mecanismo biofísico conhecido na atualidade poderia ser responsabilizado pelas correlações observadas entre os EEGS de dois sujeitos experimentais separados.

Outra reprodução que alcançou sucesso, desta vez relatada por Leanna Standish, da Universidade Bastyr, e seus colegas, foi descrita na revista médica Alternative Therapies In Health and Medicine. Eles conduziram uma experiência sobre correlação EEG com o participante receptor localizado em um scanner de imagem de ressonância magnética funcional (fMRI). Antes da experiência, examinaram 30 pares de pessoas até encontrarem um par capaz de produzir uma correlação confiável e, então, puseram uma pessoa, agindo como receptora, em um scanner fMRI, localizando a outra em um recinto distante. Descobriram um aumento significativo da atividade cerebral (probabilidades contra ocorrência casual de 14 mil para uma) no córtex visual da pessoa receptora (na parte posterior do cérebro cortical) ao mesmo tempo em que o parceiro distante contemplava uma luz intermitente. O mesmo grupo replicou os resultados com pleno sucesso em outra ocasião. Isso expressa não apenas que uma correlação significativa foi observada entre os dois cérebros, mas também que a localização precisa do cérebro associada a esta conexão foi determinada. Em 2004, Standish publicou outro artigo em que diz:

Desde 1963, sete laboratórios independentes nos Estados Unidos, México, Inglaterra e Alemanha publicaram dados mostrando sinais do EEG correlacionados de forma estatisticamente significante entre dois seres humanos que estão separados mais de 10 metros e isolados sensorialmente um do outro. Desde 1963, cada laboratório usou diferentes métodos psicofísicos, eletrofisiológicos, e estatísticos que começaram em 1963. Esses sinais cerebrais correlacionados que ocorrem entre seres humanos distantes parecem estabelecidos após 40 anos de pesquisa. A pesquisa deve agora prosseguir estudando seus mecanismos físicos e biológicos.

Offline parcus

  • Nível 32
  • *
  • Mensagens: 2.215
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #19 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 18:33:32 »
Estamos enfrentando um fenômeno que nem é fácil de descartar como falha metodológica ou artefato técnico, nem em ser entendido em sua natureza. Nenhum mecanismo biofísico conhecido na atualidade poderia ser responsabilizado pelas correlações observadas entre os EEGS de dois sujeitos experimentais separados.
Quem sabe uma mera questão de probabilidade? 8 resultados positivos de 10 só tolos considerariam como algo definitivo.
http://tomwoods.com . Venezuela, pode ir que estamos logo atrás.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #20 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 18:48:38 »
Dizer que a consciência pode sobreviver à morte não é o mesmo que afirmar que possa existir consciência sem atividade cerebral. Por que o cérebro não seria capaz de elaborar uma experiência de EQM antes da verificação do estado QM como um processo onírico que utiliza informações coletadas de forma não convencional pelos sentidos conhecidos para depois da reanimação recuperar essa "vivência"? Explicando melhor. Por algum motivo que coloque o funcionamento do cérebro em risco de morte cerebral, é disparado um processo que elabora a experiência quase morte enquanto o cérebro ainda tem condições mínimas de funcionamento. Depois da "morte cerebral" (fase sem consciência), durante a reanimação, o próprio cérebro faz um "reload" dessa experiência. Essa hipótese poderia ser testada verificando o mapeamento cerebral antes e depois da EQM. As descrições de "desdobramento astral" não devem ser levadas a sério devido à ausência de controles para essa finalidade na sala de cirurgia.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #21 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 18:52:13 »
Outro ponto interessante é que a memória não é apagada durante uma EQM. O cérebro pode muito bem se lembrar de um estado anterior e preencher o gap da EQM com a ilusão de uma vivência que pode ter sido fabricada anteriormente.

Offline Osler

  • Nível 25
  • *
  • Mensagens: 1.115
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #22 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 19:08:45 »
Caro Enfant,

Alguns esclarecimentos:

1) Como o próprio nome diz EQM envolve situações em que se pressupõe o total não funcionamente cerebral, como na Parada Cardio-Respiratória (PCR). Mesmo isso é de difícil caracterização, pois os metodos utilizados para medição de atividade cerebral como EEG.  Mas via de regra situações de PCR podem ser utilzadas para a nossa finalidade.
Ressalto porém que situações onde há atividade cerebral, mesmo que mínima, como no coma induzido não configura o quadro clássico de EQM.

2) Obviamente os relatos de EQM se baseiam no relato dos pacientes, que para isso recorrem da memória.  Como acho que está ciente existem diversas situações em que temos alterações da neuroquímica cerebral com formação de "memórias falsas", além dos ditos estados alterados da conciência.

3) Assim como o caso passado aqui você posta dois relatos anedóticos.  Como também imagino que saiba esse tipo de dado tem de ser interpretado e levado em consideração com grande parcimônia, devido aos riscos inatos de má-interpretação estatística

4) Assim como em vários outros campos se exige um certo rigor metodológico para valorização dos resultados.  No campo da EQM a maioria dos grupos tende a aplicar o controle via duplo-cego (é colocado um objeto em determinada posição, normalmente numa caixa junto ao monitor cardíaco, inacessível a observação tanto do paciente quando da equipe médica.  Idealmente ninguém da equipe que tem contato como paciente pode ter ciência direta ou indireta de qual o objeto se encontra em cada local), e nesse caso não há ainda relato ou trabalho (dos que eu tive acesso) que mostre resposta significativa.

5) De maneira geral as próprias conclusões dos artigos de EQM sao cautelosos, esse que você mandou é um exemplo típico, onde na conclusão os autores advertem que apesar de ser um resultado interessante ele não é nem de longe conclusivo

6) Há uma grande diferença em termos um evento não-explicável pelo conhecimento científico atual a afirmação "logo existe vida após a morte/conciência fora do cérebro/paranormalidade/evidência metafísica.


O primeiro caso foi investigado pelo Dr. Michael Sabom, um cardiologista em Atlanta (Sabom, 1998).
 A Srta. Reynolds relatou que logo após a cirurgia ter começado, ela ouviu um zumbido, sentiu-se deixando o corpo...
Momento no qual ainda não apresentava PCR, ou seja existia atividade cerebral...

Estas características de sua experiência parecem ter ocorrido próximo do momento em que o aneurisma foi removido, quando a parada cardíaca completa e a supressão da atividade do EEG ocorreram. .
...como demostrado nesse trecho, o período de PCR nessa cirurgia foi apenas no "tempo nobre cirurgico"


 
O segundo caso foi investigado por um de nós (B.G.) e foi relatado por nós em mais detalhes em outra obra (Cook, Greyson, & Stevenson, 1998). O paciente, Al Sullivan, relatou que, durante uma operação de emergência de desvio quádruplo em 1998, ele pareceu estar fora de seu corpo e assistir a cirurgia em curso. Um dos cirurgiões pareceu estar “batendo seus braços como se tentasse voar”.
O que é um relato anedótico e não duplo-cego

Casos como estes, nos quais a afirmação da pessoa de ter percebido acontecimentos inacessíveis a seus sentidos físicos têm sido confirmados e verificados, são ainda muito raros; mas acreditamos que casos que tenham todas as três características que descrevemos poderiam oferecer evidência sugestiva da sobrevivência da consciência após a morte, se novos casos puderem ser encontrados e adequadamente investigados logo após ocorrerem. De particular importância também seria a identificação e investigação de mais casos como o de Pam Reynolds, no qual uma atividade sensorial e cognitiva complexa e clara parecia estar ocorrendo quando praticamente toda a atividade cerebral havia cessado. Enfatizamos, no entanto, que EQM podem oferecer somente indireta evidência da continuação da consciência após a morte: porque as pessoas que vivenciaram estas experiências viveram para relatá-las, portanto elas não estavam mortas, embora pudessem estar próximas desta condição. Entretanto, EQM do tipo que descrevemos, juntamente com outros tipos de experiências sugerindo sobrevivência após a morte , oferecem convergente evidência que garante o fato de podermos levar a sério a idéia de que a consciência pode sobreviver à morte.
Como visto aqui os autores não afirmam através dessas experiências anedóticas as alegações de qualquer paranormalidade, apenas que são informações que merecem maiores investigações
“Como as massas são inconstantes, presas de desejos rebeldes, apaixonadas e sem temor pelas conseqüências, é preciso incutir-lhes medo para que se mantenham em ordem. Por isso, os antigos fizeram muito bem ao inventar os deuses e a crença no castigo depois da morte”. – Políbio

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #23 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 19:16:08 »
Citar
Na Enciclopédia Britânica de 1911 os poderes paranormais da médium Piper foram considerados como algo indiscutível.

Essa não é a opinião de Martin Gardner em “How Mrs. Piper Bamboozled William James”. ::)

O caso da Sra. Piper é interessantíssimo mas há controversias.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 11.857
  • Love it or Hate it
Re:The rise of anomalistic psychology – and the fall of parapsychology?
« Resposta #24 Online: 13 de Fevereiro de 2012, 19:31:34 »
Citar
Estamos enfrentando um fenômeno que nem é fácil de descartar como falha metodológica ou artefato técnico, nem em ser entendido em sua natureza. Nenhum mecanismo biofísico conhecido na atualidade poderia ser responsabilizado pelas correlações observadas entre os EEGS de dois sujeitos experimentais separados.

Apresentar as correlações como evidência de telepatia é como dizer que o fenômeno de "quantum entanglement" é uma comunicação telepática entre átomos.


 

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!