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Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Online: 30 de Dezembro de 2014, 21:51:39 »
Marine mystery as seal found stranded in field 20 miles from the sea

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Police behind the the grey seal spotted in a farmer’s field in Newton-le-Willows in Merseyside.

Bemused residents in rural Merseyside, in north-west England, faced a conundrum when they woke up to the sight of a seal stranded in a field miles away from the coast.

The young male grey seal was discovered on Monday by a dog walker. It was flapping against a fence post by Newton brook in Newton-le-Willows, near St Helens, which is 20 miles inland.

Police, animal rescue officers and a farmer used brooms and metal fences to try to herd the distressed animal into a trailer. Eventually a piece of mackerel did the trick, and the disorientated outsider was captured and transferred to a wildlife centre in Nantwich, Cheshire.

Curious onlookers, who were warned not to get too close to the seal because of the aggressive nature of the animals, concluded the most likely explanation was it had travelled up the river Mersey before getting lost in the brook. There is a grey seal colony near Hilbre Island in the Dee estuary, which is 50 miles away.

The unusual scene drew a lot of local interest as police called for help from the British Divers Marine Life Rescue Service (BDMLR), the animal welfare charity RSPCA and the Merseyside fire service.

Rachael Fraser, from BDMLR, said: “We think he’s come from the Mersey area, which is tidal, and he’s come up the bank here and he’s got lost. It’s very unusual.”

Steve Marsh, also from BDMLR, said the rescue was a challenge: “It’s not an easy job certainly because they are large animals.”

Nicola Watkinson, who works at the Red Bank farm shop, told the Liverpool Echo: “Someone rang up this morning and said there’s a great big sea lion outside our shop. The only thing they can think of is that there’s a little brook nearby, so maybe it has come from there. We’ve got traffic piled up with people looking at it, and there’s lots of police here.”

She added that people tried to get near the seal “but it’s not very friendly”.

Gary Watkinson, a farmer, said: “We just saw it lying there this morning. It’s definitely come up from the brook near here. I tracked its movements and you can see the marks in the soil.”

Merseyside police said: “Police and fire officers, with the help of a local farmer, have herded the seal on to an RSPCA trailer.

“Its condition is described as being exhausted and has now been taken to the RSPCA’s wildlife hospital in Stapeley Grange, Nantwich, for assessment.

If the seal recovers fully, it is hoped that it will be possible to release it back into the sea in the near future.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/dec/22/seal-found-in-field-merseyside-rescue-under-way
« Última modificação: 31 de Dezembro de 2014, 13:01:45 por Gigaview »

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios Misteriosos
« Resposta #1 Online: 30 de Dezembro de 2014, 22:01:44 »
Barber woke from coma speaking fluent French and thinking he was Matthew McConaughey


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Rory Curtis in the changing at Carrington football ground training for the Manchester Utd. Youth team, aged 16.


A barber has told how he woke up from a coma following a car crash speaking fluent French and thinking he was Matthew McConaughey.
Rory Curtis, 25, suffered horrific injuries after the vehicle he was driving hit a lorry before six cars ploughed into the side him during torrential rain on the M42.

Firefighters battled to free him from the wreckage for 40 minutes at the scene in Tamworth, Staffordshire, before he was then airlifted hospital.
Doctors found he had suffered a multifocal intracranial brain haemorrhage, which meant his blood vessels had burst and blood was leaking into his brain.

When he finally came round Mr Curtis started speaking to nurses in fluent French - despite not studying the language since school.

In his head he had also convinced himself he was Hollywood A-list actor Matthew McConaughey.

Mr Curtis, from Redditch, Worcestershire, said: "It's quite bizarre to say the least.

"I didn't even do French at GCSE so haven't studied it since Year 9 - then all of a sudden I'm fluent in it.

"I can't explain how it happened. It's incredible really.

"I don't remember coming round but my family said one of the nurses was from Africa and spoke French and I was having conversations with her.

"I was just casually chatting away about how I was feeling in this perfect French accent.

"My mum and dad were stunned when they got to hospital and the nurse asked them what side of the family was French.

"And then I was sitting there spouting a foreign language from my hospital bed acting all French in their sort of arrogant yet sophisticated way. It wasn't me at all.

"I wasn't really that good at it at school, so I don't how my brain has managed to do what is has. I don't know how I know it - I just do.

"Also, in my head I thought I was Matthew McConaughey.

"When I went to the toilet I went to look in the mirror and I was shocked because I didn't look like him, I didn't know what I was looking at.

"Then slowly over time it eventually clicked and I thought "he is an actor, what am I on about?

"But at times I was in hospital thinking I can't wait to get out of here and back to filming movies.

"I was convinced I was him and that I had his good looks as well - I know it was hopeful thinking really."

Mr Curtis was treated with an experimental drug after his family were approached by the National Institute for Health Research Surgical
Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre.

He became only the second person in Britain to have the treatment - which drew upon the Ministry of Defence's expertise with injured soldiers.
He made a recovery and was allowed home just two months after the accident in August 2012 but faced months of rehab.

Now he has now retrained as a barber and is learning to teach hairdressing himself while he works at his aunt's salon in Birmingham.

Mr Curtis, who had trials with Manchester United at the age of 14, said he is convinced his recovery is down to the experimental drug.
He added: "I feel it made a difference to me.

"Because I don't remember the crash, it doesn't feel like I've had a brain injury. Apart from obviously being able to now speak French.

"The accident changed my outlook on life. I can't leave the house now without telling everyone I love them and giving them a hug.

"I know with a click of your fingers, it could all be over, because life is fragile. There's no point in wasting any time."

His mother Vera, 57, said: "He is so lucky to be alive. When I saw him, I felt the most despair at not being able to help him.

"He didn't look like my Rory. He was always so fit and now he looked like a little old man. His hip was smashed to pieces. The bone had crumbled away.

"It was a real roller-coaster. We thought we would lose him.

"Then all of a sudden he wakes up and he's speaking French.

"This nurse was from Africa and spoke French - she asked us what side of the family was from France, as his accent was so good.

"Well I told her none of us. She not believe it. The brain really is an incredible thing, nobody has quite been able to explain why it has happened."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/howaboutthat/11307568/Barber-woke-from-coma-speaking-fluent-French-and-thinking-he-was-Matthew-McConaughey.html

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios Misteriosos
« Resposta #2 Online: 30 de Dezembro de 2014, 22:08:34 »
Strange ice pancakes appear on Scottish river




These strange frozen saucers were found during a recent cold snap near the River Dee -- a salmon-filled waterway that passes by the British Queen's summer residence, Balmoral Castle, before heading eastwards to the coastal city of Aberdeen.

River Dee Trust biologist Jamie Urquhart made the discovery and took the photos at Lummels Pool, Birse -- several miles downstream of Balmoral.

The trust said it was initially unsure what caused the pancakes, but suspects they're caused by a rare phenomenon in which foam freezes in a swirling eddy.

Rare occurrence

"Perhaps each disc grew when smaller pieces of unfrozen foam struck the disc, adhered and then froze in place," it wrote on its website.

"The raised rims are undoubtedly due to the collisions but what about the inner lines?

"The air temperature was colder at night due to the clear-sky conditions but warmer in the day, meaning the discs may have grown at night, then during the day, when the discs softened in the sun, further collisions between the 'pancakes' caused the rims to be pushed up.

"The next night further growth would have occurred, followed by a new rim the next day."

The Trust said it's the first time the pancakes, more commonly found in the Antarctic or the Baltic Sea, have been seen on the River Dee.

http://www.wcvb.com/money/travel/strange-ice-pancakes-appear-on-scottish-river/30295022

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #3 Online: 31 de Dezembro de 2014, 18:06:35 »
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Kazakhstan villagers suffer from unknown sleeping disorder

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/jiKP0HioAYs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/jiKP0HioAYs</a>

Every tenth villager of Kazakhstan's Kalachi has unexpectedly fallen asleep in broad daylight – some unable to wake up for several days. Despite numerous attempts to find the cause of the inexplicable disorder, the Sleepy Hollow riddle remains unsolved.

Over 600 residents of Kalachi village in Kazakhstan's north may have never read Washington Irving's 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow,' or watched the popular American TV series or film – but they refer to their homeland as "Sleepy Hollow," as everyone there is scared of an indiscriminate illness that has no cure.

People in Kalachi have been suffering from the "sleep epidemic" – as they call it – for the past couple of years. Everyone in the village has a family member or a friend who's fallen asleep for no apparent reason, with over 100 people having experienced it by now – some more than once – according to locals.

In one of the recent cases, children started falling down on the first day of school in September, with eight kids falling asleep within one hour. Before that, 20 people fainted and slept for several days, and "at least 60 at once in the winter...we laid them in rows," an ambulance worker told RTD, which traveled to the area to undertake its own investigation.

Groups of scientists and medics – including virologists, radiologists, and toxicologists – have visited the village to address the issue. Still, the causes and consequences of the sleepy condition remain unknown, leaving those affected to fear that they might one day simply not wake up.

"If you try to wake him, it seems he wants to open his eyes – but can't. He's sleeping and sleeping..." Igor Samusenko, father of a child who is suffering from the illness, told RTD. People have also described further symptoms, including hallucinations (one boy was picking snails off himself), memory loss, dizziness, and nausea.

"I'm weak, my legs feel heavy, as if I'm wearing a hundred pairs of boots, and my head is spinning," one woman told RTD. Other patients behave "like they're drunk." It's difficult to warn others and ask for help, as "your tongue gets twisted."

Doctors say that "some people [have] slept for the whole week.”

People suffering from the sleeping sickness are diagnosed with various diseases. While children are being cured from toxic encephalopathy, a brain malfunction, adults are said to have suffered strokes. But after several days in intensive care, they're back to normal life – until they feel abnormally sleepy again. Some doctors say that mass psychosis is to blame.

Many believe the extreme sleepiness is caused by the wind blowing from a mine near Kalachi. In Soviet times, the village was deemed top secret due to uranium mining. The mine closed over two decades ago, and the area is now partly abandoned. What used to be a prosperous neighborhood is now left in ruins.

Neither residents nor medics blame radiation for the sleepy anomaly.

"People worked in mines for so many years, and no one fell asleep," former miners say.

No symptoms of sleepiness have been described in studies of various forms of radiation disease, doctors say.

While radiation levels in the town and at the mine closest to it are at a normal 16 micro-roentgen per hour, the RTD team's dose rate meter showed an alarming 268 micro-roentgen per hour at an abandoned filled-in shaft mine further from the village. An independent analysis of Kalachi's water, soil, and vegetation samples did not identify anything abnormal.

http://rt.com/news/214379-sleepy-hollow-kazakhstan-disease/

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #4 Online: 31 de Dezembro de 2014, 18:23:06 »
There's a Suicide Epidemic in Utah — And One Neuroscientist Thinks He Knows Why


This partner story is part of BrainMic, a collaboration with GE to share the latest advances in brain research and technology.


Living in Utah means packed powder in April, canyoneering in the clouds, snow-capped vistas so vivid they look Photoshopped — and the shortest average work week in the country. So it's not surprising that surveys show how much Utah residents love their outdoorsy, adventure-filled state.

But there's another side to Utah that isn't shown in surveys. Despite ranking as America's happiest state, Utah has disproportionately high rates of suicide and associated mood disorders compared to the rest of the country. In fact, it's the No. 1 state for antidepressant use. These polarized feelings of despondency and delight underlie a confusing phenomenon that Perry Renshaw, a neuroscientist at the University of Utah investigating the strange juxtaposition, calls the "Utah paradox."

Utah residents and experts are aware of the paradox, often attributing gun use, low population density and the area's heavy Mormon influence as potential factors. But Renshaw thinks he's identified a more likely cause for the Utah blues: altitude.

Renshaw believes that altitude has an impact on our brain chemistry, specifically that it changes the levels of serotonin and dopamine, two key chemicals in the brain that help regulate our feelings of happiness. America's favorite antidepressants (and party drugs) work by controlling the level of these chemicals in the brain. The air in Utah, one could say, works just like this.

Since moving to Utah in 2008, Renshaw has found mounting statistical, scientific and anecdotal support for his theory. If Renshaw's theory holds true, his work represents a major step forward in solving a long-standing mental health mystery.

Westward, ho?

Utah lies in a region of the country commonly known as the Rockies, the mountain states or even just "out west." To those who analyze violent death data, it's known as the "suicide belt."

According to the National Violent Death Reporting System, a surveillance system run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Utah and other states in the Rockies consistently have the highest suicide rates in the country aside from Alaska. In the map below, the block of red — states with suicide rates over 14 per 100,000 people — is hard to miss.


Image Credit: KSL.com via CDC

Before heading west, Renshaw studied the effects of drug abuse on brain chemistry at Harvard Medical School. When he started working at the Salt Lake City Veteran Affairs' mental illness center five years ago, suicide research was a priority. Shortly after Renshaw arrived, a suicidologist presented a map depicting suicide rates.

"From the beginning," Renshaw said, recalling his developing eureka moment, "the statistical evidence seemed off the charts."

To see if statistics could help explain why so many mountain-dwelling Americans commit suicide, Renshaw analyzed data on altitude, suicide and mental illness over the last five years.

In a 2011 study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, a group of researchers, including Renshaw, analyzed state suicide rates with respect to gun ownership, population density, poverty, health insurance quality and availability of psychiatric care. Of all the factors, altitude had the strongest link to suicide — even the group of states with the least available psychiatric care had fewer suicides than the highest-altitude states, where psychiatric care was easier to find.

In a follow-up study, Renshaw looked at instances of suicide that involved guns and those that didn't. Again, he found a positive correlation between suicide and altitude across the board.

Renshaw also used CDC violent death data to examine the relationship between altitude and mental illness. The elevation at which people live, he found, is a strong predictor of their mental health status. 



Image Credit: Perry Renshaw via Ranking America's Mental Health

Renshaw discovered research supporting his theory. Doctors from Case Western University, it turned out, were crunching numbers based on a similar hunch about altitude and suicide. In a 2010 study published in High Altitude Medicine and Biology, the Case Western group analyzed suicide rates across 2,584 counties in 16 states and found that suicides start increasing between 2,000 and 3,000 feet in all U.S. regions. The U.S. isn't a special case — analysis of suicide rates in other countries, including South Korea and Austria, bore similar results.

Psychology research has also made a connection between mental health and elevation. In a 2005 study, the Naval Health Research Center measured mood changes in Marines who left seaside San Diego for 30 days of strenuous training in the Northern California mountains. Before training, the Marines completed a self-evaluation of their levels of anxiety, dejection, fatigue and bewilderment, among other mood symptoms. They completed the same evaluation after training ended, and then again 90 days later. While their physical fitness improved during training, their mental health disintegrated. Before training, the Marines reported more balanced mood levels than average college-aged men. By the time they finished, they described mood symptoms comparable to those of psychiatric patients. Ninety days later, they were just as sad and agitated.

All of this evidence, Renshaw says, seemed too strong to dismiss as coincidental. Based on a comparison of suicide rates at sea level and at areas above 2,000 feet, living at a high altitude may make people 30% more likely to commit suicide.


Image Credit: Perry Renshaw via Journal of High Altitude Medicine and Biology

More than numbers

In addition to the statistical evidence, Renshaw collected anecdotes that supported his developing theory.

Five years ago in Park City, Utah, Renshaw presented his theory and his research on suicide. Afterward, he was approached by a female audience member who was part of a support group of women — women who began showing symptoms of anxiety and depression only after they moved to Utah. She was floored to hear Renshaw's theory, which made sense of her group's shared, confusing mental health issues.

And Renshaw also learned that the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, which sits 7,000 feet above sea level, struggled to hold on to out-of-state professors, who often left after a few months because they felt off, physically and mentally. Out-of-state students from low-altitude areas also fared worse academically than their in-state counterparts.

Renshaw himself undertook an informal study of researchers who moved to Utah from coastal areas and found that around 35% experienced new, often pronounced, symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Still, a host of evidence spoke to the other side of the paradox — the positive feelings associated with living in America's "happiest" state. Clinical trial participants who grew up in Utah and moved away, for example, often told Renshaw they returned home to the "call of the mountains." He spoke to researchers in Colorado who reported the same trend: People born and raised in the mountains moved to lower land and found themselves longing for their home state.


Salt Lake Valley. Image Credit: Scott Catron via Wikimedia Commons

Additionally, Renshaw became aware of a Latter Day Saints training center in Provo, Utah, where Mormons from around the country went to brush up on religious recruitment skills. He heard that many missionaries in training diagnosed with ADD stopped taking their medication within a few weeks of arriving at the center. This medical quirk dovetailed with statistics about ADD and ADHD — the rate of diagnosis in Salt Lake City is consistently 50% lower than ocean-hugging New York City.

Together, the stray statistics and stories about life out west tipped off Renshaw to a common culprit: altitude-induced oxygen depletion.

There is such a thing as too much fresh air

As anyone who saw Gravity knows, oxygen density decreases as altitude rises. Oxygen deprivation from high altitude induces a condition called hypobaric hypoxia, which ranges in severity based on how little oxygen is available. Some hypoxic effects are well known — nausea and headaches from altitude sickness, nosebleeds and lower alcohol tolerance, for example. But while physical afflictions associated with hypoxia have gained academic and mainstream attention, scientists have largely ignored its potential impact on mental health.

Renshaw believes that oxygen-poor air tampers with brain chemistry, leading to a drop in serotonin and an uptick in dopamine. Serotonin and dopamine are neurotransmitters, brain chemicals that relay signals between neurons and other cells.

Serotonin, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, helps stabilize emotions. Antidepressants — SSRIs, (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), which include Prozac and Lexapro — work by blocking the transport of serotonin back to the neurons, thereby increasing its supply in the brain.

Dopamine, an excitatory neurotransmitter, plays a vital role in our ability to focus. Too little dopamine can make us scatterbrained, whereas a dopamine increase causes hyper-concentration and feelings of euphoria. Caffeine, prescription drugs, including some ADD/ADHD medications, and illegal stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine, work by increasing the availability of dopamine in our brains.

So why do some people enjoy the benefits of the Utah air's impact on increased dopamine levels, which should make us happier, and some fall victim to the impact on decreased levels of serotonin, which would make us more depressed?

The answer lies in how changes in neurotransmitter levels affect our individual brain chemistry.

As Renshaw's theory goes, serotonin deficiency exacerbates symptoms of pre-existing anxiety and depression, increasing the likelihood of becoming suicidal (mental illness is a factor in about 90% of suicides). People with an existing mood disorder, or a predisposition to mental illness, would be more sensitive to the effects of waning serotonin levels.

Women, who naturally have half as much serotonin as men, Renshaw said, are more likely to develop a mood disorder as a result of living in the mountains (about 24% of middle-aged women in Utah take an SSRI — double the national rate. The various anecdotes about anxious Utah women, Renshaw believes, bolster his theory).


From left to right, depiction of serotonin release in a control situation, affected by SSRI Prozac, and at a high altitude. Image Credit: Perry Renshaw

But those without a predisposition to mental illness will, on the flip side, feel happier. By Renshaw's estimates, the brain makes about 20% more dopamine in the mountains.

People who leave their hearts in Utah might be homesick for their family and friends, but they may also be missing the high of living up high. Outdoor junkies, Renshaw proffered, could be just that: junkies jonesing for some oxygen-deprived air.

Similarly, though Mormon missionaries attribute discontinuing ADD medications to a religious awakening, Renshaw proposes a more cynical explanation: Since ADD and ADHD are both dopamine deficiency disorders, these missionaries are trading one source of dopamine enhancement for another.

Utah pharmacies are dispensing SSRIs in droves, especially to middle-aged women. But Renshaw isn't sure the pills are working. SSRIs don't create serotonin — they merely preserve what's already in the brain, thereby increasing the availability of a chemical that helps balance mood. Thanks to the blood-brain barrier, it's notoriously hard to treat neurologically-based disorders through traditional treatment methods, like pills, injections or adhesive patches. We can get medication into the bloodstream, but it won't actually reach the brain. For people who don't have any serotonin — perhaps because hypoxia decreased their already-low supply — SSRIs are probably no more effective than prescription-plan tic tacs.

A controversial theory

Renshaw's previous neuroimaging work at Harvard laid the foundation for his theory that oxygen deprivation affects brain chemistry. Using the same equipment that generate MRIs, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) lets scientists measure minute levels of neurotransmitters in the brain. Before shifting his focus to the altitude-addled brain, Renshaw used MRS to study the impact of drug abuse on brain chemistry.

"If I wasn't a spectroscopist and studying changes in brain chemistry associated with mood disorders," Renshaw said, "there's no way I would have figured out the connection between altitude and suicide."

Others didn't see it like he did. When Renshaw peddled his altitude-suicide theory around the mountain states in 2008, he faced prickly reception. Renshaw heard that Utah's governor at the time, Jon Huntsman, was disgusted that the state would fund the anti-Utah research. Huntsman's staff did not respond to a request for comment.

And Renshaw said he delivered a presentation at Mormon-stronghold Brigham Young University that provoked outrage among audience members. However, after he finished speaking, three students shared separate stories of friends or relatives committing suicide shortly after moving to Utah.

But Renshaw insists that mountain folk need not flee to the coasts based on his findings. Rather, understanding how altitude might affect brain chemistry is knowledge that can be used to improve mental illness treatment and, hopefully, curb suicide.

More and more, scientists are starting to see it how Renshaw does.

Doug Gray, a suicidologist at the University of Utah, has been studying suicide in the western mountain states for over 20 years. Whenever he makes a presentation, Gray said, he asks audience members why they think the region has such high suicide rates. People generally offer a cultural explanation, but Gray's never been persuaded.

"Nevada and Colorado also have high suicide rates," Gray said, reflecting on theories ventured over the years. "You tell me how Salt Lake City and Las Vegas have the same culture."

About six years ago, Renshaw caught Gray's presentation at a conference where Renshaw was also scheduled to speak. Gray posed his usual question to the audience and, per Gray's recollection, Renshaw raised his hand and said, "Did you know that at high altitude, the brain goes through metabolic changes, and some people can adapt while others can't, based on their DNA?"

Gray's jaw dropped.

"Well," Gray recalls saying, "that would explain it."

Renshaw's work, in Gray's opinion, won't gain mainstream acceptance for a while. But, he believes the theory is only getting stronger, as Renshaw corroborates the mental illness-altitude connection through animal studies and clinical trials for natural substances to help treat some hypoxia-induced mood disorders.

Renshaw, too, is confident his findings are beyond the realm of a fluke, but he isn't willing to dismiss other explanations for the suicide-altitude connection, including studies on gun access. Multiple overlapping factors, he says, are likely in play.

Nevertheless, some environmental factors we commonly accept as relevant to our mental welfare seemed absurd less than a generation ago. In the 1980s, for example, experts were skeptical that depression could stem from seasonal shifts in sunlight exposure. But 30 years after seasonal affective disorder got its name, SAD sufferers plant themselves in front of light boxes to combat the winter doldrums without anyone raising any eyebrows. 

As a practical matter, Renshaw said, it's hard to study the impact of changing altitude on neurotransmitter levels in humans. But studies have looked at brain chemistry changes in rats at very high simulated altitudes — comparable to that of the Andes mountains — and seen serotonin levels drop while dopamine levels surged. Renshaw is currently conducting his own study on neurotransmitter levels in rats at different altitudes.

When it comes to subjects as biologically and environmentally thorny as mental health and suicide, Renshaw said, the answer is always more research.

http://mic.com/articles/104096/there-s-a-suicide-epidemic-in-utah-and-one-neuroscientist-thinks-he-knows-why?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #5 Online: 20 de Janeiro de 2015, 20:28:35 »
Can YOU solve the mystery of UVB-76? Radio station has 'buzzed' every second since the 1970s - but no one knows why



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/gDxVF79ocWw#t=73" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/gDxVF79ocWw#t=73</a>


A Russian radio station has played a buzzing sound for four decades
Every few months it is interrupted by a voice relaying a coded message
But no one knows the exact purpose of the station or the message
Predominant theories suggest it is a station used by the military
Others suggest it may be a counter-attack measure for nuclear war


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2877988/Can-solve-mystery-UVB-76-Radio-station-buzzed-second-1970s-no-one-knows-why.html

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Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #7 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 16:15:43 »
Alguém se lembra de Elisa Lam? Uma jovem canadense de 21 anos que em 213 foi encontrada morta dentro de uma das caixas d’água do hotel no qual estava hospedada. A fatalidade ocorreu no Cecil Hotel de Los Angeles, na Califórnia, e as autoridades responsáveis pela investigação classificaram o caso como afogamento acidental.

A necropsia realizada no corpo de Lam não revelou qualquer sinal de violência, e os exames toxicológicos não indicaram a presença de drogas ou álcool. No entanto, as estranhas circunstâncias envolvendo o afogamento da moça levantaram muitas teorias bizarras.



Estranho Comportamento

O cadáver foi encontrado por um funcionário do hotel dentro de uma das quatro caixas d’água — com quase 2,5 metros de altura e 1,2 de diâmetro cada uma — instaladas no terraço do edifício. O rapaz foi até lá checar o que havia de errado depois que alguns hóspedes começaram a reclamar de falta de pressão na água.

Segundo os informes, apesar de as caixas d’água estarem com as aberturas destrancadas, o interior era de difícil acesso e ninguém sabe explicar como é que Lam foi parar dentro de uma delas. Aliás, foi necessário cortar a estrutura para retirar o corpo.



Além disso, a câmera de segurança do elevador do hotel registrou o momento em que a canadense sobe até o terraço, e as imagens revelaram um comportamento bem bizarro. Confira a seguir:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/3TjVBpyTeZM&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/3TjVBpyTeZM&amp;feature=youtu.be</a>

Lam se hospedou no Cecil Hotel, conhecido por oferecer estadia barata no centro da cidade a turistas estrangeiros. Entretanto, além das diárias, o hotel também alugava quartos para períodos longos, e ganhou uma reputação bem sinistra depois de abrigar hóspedes prá lá de suspeitos e até mesmo serial killers, como Richard Ramirez, responsável pela morte de 13 mulheres.

E também o famoso austríaco Johann Unterweger.



O cara da foto foi condenado à perpétua por estrangular prostitutas com seus próprios sutiens, mas na cadeia escreveu uma biografia que se tornou best-seller, o que desencadeou uma campanha para a sua libertação, o que acabou de fato ocorrendo. Virou apresentador de TV, participava de debates sobre reabilitação de detentos e... estrangulava mulheres.

Matou mais 13 na Áustria e viajou para Los Angeles, se hospedando no mesmo hotel onde ocorreu a misteriosa fatalidade com Elisa Lam, e lá matou mais 3 prostitutas.

Além dessas figuras ilustres, o Cecil também foi palco de suicídios, assassinatos e mortes acidentais, assim como de uma série de coincidências macabras. Há quem trace paralelos entre o hotel e Elizabeth Short, que foi brutalmente assassinada em 1947 e ficou conhecida como “Dália Negra”. Aparentemente, Short teria passado pelo Hotel Cecil antes de desaparecer, e o crime estaria repleto de aspectos ritualísticos.



Elisa Lam e Elizabeth Short

Depois da morte de Elisa alguns começaram a ver relação entre o hotel e o filme “Água Negra”, cujos personagens principais se chamam Dhalia e Cecilia, ou seja, seus nomes teriam sido inspirados no apelido de Elizabeth Short e no nome do hotel. No longa, as duas protagonistas — mãe e filha — se mudam para um apartamento assombrado, descobrindo mais tarde que uma moça havia morrido afogada em um tanque no último andar do edifício. O filme é de 2005, oito anos antes do trágico acidente com Elisa Lam.

Para apimentar ainda mais a imaginação dos esotéricos pouco tempo depois houve uma epidemia de tuberculose em Skid Row, cidade vizinha, e o teste para fazer o diagnóstico chamava-se justamente Lam-Elisa.

O que teria acontecido com Elisa? Por que seu estranho comportamento no elevador? Com quem ela parecia estar falando? De quem se escondia? Por que o elevador não funcionou quando a moça apertou os botões?

Tchan, tchan, tchan...



Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #8 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 16:44:40 »
Ainda sobre Elisa Lam:

Era fácil chegar no terraço.

Era fácil entrar em uma das caixas d'água.

É normal o elevador desse hotel não funcionar.

É o que mostra o vídeo abaixo.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/09s7UDk1W3s" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/09s7UDk1W3s</a>

Offline Sergiomgbr

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #9 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 17:04:56 »
Falta muita informação sobre o caso até mesmo pra especular, mas eu diria que dependendo do fluxo de água da caixa d'água e na falta de um ladrão  a mulher pode ter sido sorvida pelo único buraco aberto mesmo que pequeno.

Offline Feliperj

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #10 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 19:54:33 »
Vcs conhecem esse - A Esfera de Betz


Offline Arcanjo Lúcifer

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #11 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 21:09:41 »
Alguém se lembra de Elisa Lam? (...)

Ela não sofria de alguma doença mental como esquizofrenia? Pode ter entrado lá para se esconder de algum inimigo imaginário.

Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #12 Online: 04 de Julho de 2015, 22:18:51 »
Alguém se lembra de Elisa Lam? (...)

Ela não sofria de alguma doença mental como esquizofrenia? Pode ter entrado lá para se esconder de algum inimigo imaginário.


Não era esquizofrênica mas sofria de transtorno bipolar.

Uma coisa que esqueci de mencionar: ela foi encontrada nua, e suas roupas jamais foram achadas.

Offline Arcanjo Lúcifer

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #13 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 06:40:56 »
Suicídio.

Ela deve ter jogado as roupas em alguma lixeira no caminho.

Offline Gabarito

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #14 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 09:33:00 »
Alguém se lembra de Elisa Lam? (...)

Ela não sofria de alguma doença mental como esquizofrenia? Pode ter entrado lá para se esconder de algum inimigo imaginário.


Não era esquizofrênica mas sofria de transtorno bipolar.

Uma coisa que esqueci de mencionar: ela foi encontrada nua, e suas roupas jamais foram achadas.


Pedro Reis, eu entendo o grau de mistério que você tem dado a esse caso. Mas não é muito difícil encontrar explicações para as perguntas feitas por aqueles que encontram mistério em coisas simples.

Veja bem, a mocinha já foi dada como portadora de transtorno psicológico. O comportamento dela no elevador dá a entender que ela estava num dia de muita agitação, conseguindo criar em sua mente joguinhos de esconde-esconde, brincadeiras consigo própria, risadinhas, ações que algumas crianças também fazem, com gestos abruptos, olhares furtivos e imaginando mais alguém por perto e se escondendo desse alguém. Não é difícil de imaginar que ela estava numa brincadeira no seu espaço mental, criando cenas em que ela espionava mais alguém, olhava às escondidas.

Eu li a página do Assombrado e a outra que faz a análise do comportamento e linguagem corporal. Eles também enxergam um ar de brincadeira e jogos, nesse caso, com conotação sexual. Isso corrobora, em parte, o que eu consigo ver no caso.

Nessa sua aventura, ela encontrou o acesso à escada que leva às caixas d'água. Para ela, aquilo foi uma excitante descoberta: uma piscina, onde ela poderia se deliciar num banho de imersão, coisa que não havia naquele hotel. Aquilo iria coroar sua aventura e brincadeira daquele dia.

- Que maravilha! Uma piscina. Vou mergulhar já!

Se você olhar a altura do reservatório e a tampa dele vai perceber que, uma vez pulando lá dentro e com a água num nível não muito alto, será impossível para alguém conseguir se alçar de volta ao seu topo. No seu afã de brincadeira, ela não pensou em como voltar. Ela só pensou em entrar e mergulhar naquele maravilhoso banho. É bem fácil de imaginar. Alguém em estado de excitação e euforia, até mesmo sem problemas de transtorno bipolar, pode passar por isso: mergulhar logo sem pensar em como voltar para o topo do reservatório.

Veja:



E foi isso. Ela mergulhou, aproveitou sua aventura daquele dia, e pensou em sair. Mas sair como? O buraco lá em cima poderia estar inacessível pelo nível baixo da água, ou mesmo se estivesse ao alcance, muito dificilmente alguém (principalmente mulher, que não tem muita força nos braços) conseguiria se alçar de volta para o topo. Com o agravante de ela estar molhada e a superfície do reservatório ser de metal e não tem alças ou pontos de apoio para se segurar. Imagine a cena: a moça nadando ou boiando dentro de um reservatório com abertura pequena, molhada e sem pontos para se segurar nem forças para se alçar de volta. Vamos gritar por socorro. Ela deve ter gritado muito, mas no alto daquele hotel não tinha vivalma que pudesse ouvi-la. Gritou até se exaurir e acabou morrendo de cansaço e afogamento.

As roupas? Ela deve tê-las tirado para o seu mergulho e o vento forte no alto de um prédio, o que é comum, levou-as embora.

Nesses tempos de Internet, coisas simples podem tomar rumos de mistério e ganhar muitos contornos sensacionalistas para alimentar o enorme mercado desse setor. Tem muito consumidor de fantástico e extraordinário por aí afora.

Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #15 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 11:26:44 »
Não é impossível, mas pode-se especular explicação muito mais simples que não requeira imaginar toda uma extensa sequência exata de passos mentais que a vítima teria que executar para tornar a tese plausível.

Psicólogos que examinaram o vídeo concluíram que o comportamento de Elisa poderia ser o de alguém envolvida em alguma espécie de jogo sexual com outra pessoa. Talvez a pessoa com quem ela aparece falando no vídeo.

Uma pessoa portadora de transtorno bipolar se caracteriza por alternar momentos de grande euforia com profunda depressão. Não faz parte do quadro ter alucinações ou conversar com amigos imaginários.

É mais fácil supor, sem a necessidade de tantos "ad hocs", que a moça possa ter sido vítima de um psicopata que a induziu a subir com ele ao terraço.

Em 1998, Francisco de Assis Pereira - mais conhecido como Maníaco do Parque -, um simples entregador de pizza, foi capaz de convencer 6 vítimas. seis mulheres jovens consideradas psiquicamente equilibradas, a seguirem com ele a um lugar ermo onde encontraram a morte.

A última das vítimas era uma linda moça, de classe média alta, inteligente, que falava 3 idiomas e estava se formando em Comércio Exterior.

Foi abordada pelo psicopata, que ela jamais havia visto antes, em um sinal de trânsito, onde este se encontrava parado com sua sedutora moto de entregador de pizza. De lá, depois de uma rápida passada em casa, seguiu na garupa do motoboy para o matagal onde seria assassinada.




Offline Gigaview

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #16 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 12:10:00 »
Sem dúvida mais um caso de abdução alienígena com devolução corporal equivocada. Isso acontece muito em tanques de Coca-Cola.

Offline Arcanjo Lúcifer

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #17 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 12:19:02 »
Um simples cadeado na tampa do reservatório teria evitado o problema, parece besteira mas um doido qualquer poderia ter envenenado a água se quisesse.

Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #18 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 12:30:05 »
E a tal esfera dos Betz? Alguém sugere uma explicação?

Procurei em sites de ceticismo mas não encontrei nada.

Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #19 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 13:44:10 »
Um simples cadeado na tampa do reservatório teria evitado o problema, parece besteira mas um doido qualquer poderia ter envenenado a água se quisesse.

O engraçado é que o hotel tinha trancado a porta que dava acesso ao terraço e ainda se deu ao cuidado de por um alarme eletrônico na porta de aço. Porém, ao lado, deixou livre a passagem pela escada de incêndio. E não era uma dessas escadas que a pessoa tem que se esforçar para subir, por fotos se vê que é uma escada normal, com corrimão e tudo, por onde qualquer um sobe na maior tranquilidade.

Se tivesse sido em Portugal virava piada. No Cecil Hotel já tinham acontecido casos de suicídio, assassinatos, serial killers... o escambau... então alguém se preocupou em vedar a passagem para a cobertura do prédio: pôs porta de aço, tranca, alarme... e deixou a escada aberta.



Na foto, do lado direito, a escada externa que dava acesso ao terraço.
« Última modificação: 05 de Julho de 2015, 13:49:18 por Pedro Reis »

Offline Lorentz

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #20 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 13:45:49 »
E a tal esfera dos Betz? Alguém sugere uma explicação?

Procurei em sites de ceticismo mas não encontrei nada.

Ser uma válvula me parece o suficiente. O cara do vídeo insinua que nenhum cientista soube dizer o que se trata. Mas cientistas não são experts em esferas e válvulas. Talvez engenheiros sim.
"Amy, technology isn't intrinsically good or bad. It's all in how you use it, like the death ray." - Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth

Offline Pedro Reis

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #21 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 14:01:13 »
E por falar em mistérios muito muito misteriosos mesmos, incompreensíveis, insondáveis e insolúveis, vocês sabiam que o cara que mais recebe correspondências no sistema prisional brasileiro é justamente o Francisco de Assis Pereira, vulgo "maníaco do parque".

São cartas de mulheres, e o sujeito acabou se casando na prisão com uma dessas doidas que escreviam pra ele.

Cabeça de mulher: o maior dos mistériosss...

Offline Lorentz

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #22 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 15:19:36 »
E por falar em mistérios muito muito misteriosos mesmos, incompreensíveis, insondáveis e insolúveis, vocês sabiam que o cara que mais recebe correspondências no sistema prisional brasileiro é justamente o Francisco de Assis Pereira, vulgo "maníaco do parque".

São cartas de mulheres, e o sujeito acabou se casando na prisão com uma dessas doidas que escreviam pra ele.

Cabeça de mulher: o maior dos mistériosss...

Ou seja, não adianta ter dinheiro, malhar pra ficar bombado, ter uma mansão... O que importa é ter lábia.
"Amy, technology isn't intrinsically good or bad. It's all in how you use it, like the death ray." - Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth

Offline Johnny Cash

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #23 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 16:30:37 »
E por falar em mistérios muito muito misteriosos mesmos, incompreensíveis, insondáveis e insolúveis, vocês sabiam que o cara que mais recebe correspondências no sistema prisional brasileiro é justamente o Francisco de Assis Pereira, vulgo "maníaco do parque".

São cartas de mulheres, e o sujeito acabou se casando na prisão com uma dessas doidas que escreviam pra ele.

Cabeça de mulher: o maior dos mistériosss...

Ou seja, não adianta ter dinheiro, malhar pra ficar bombado, ter uma mansão... O que importa é ter lábia.

Lembro de ter lido algo sobre mulheres acharem criminosos atraentes. Não sei se o que conta é exatamente a lábia, mas algo relacionado à exposição ao risco, violência, possibilidades de ganhos rápidos... narcisismo...

Offline Johnny Cash

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Re:Tópico para Estranhos Mistérios muito Misteriosos
« Resposta #24 Online: 05 de Julho de 2015, 16:33:54 »
E a tal esfera dos Betz? Alguém sugere uma explicação?

Procurei em sites de ceticismo mas não encontrei nada.

Ser uma válvula me parece o suficiente. O cara do vídeo insinua que nenhum cientista soube dizer o que se trata. Mas cientistas não são experts em esferas e válvulas. Talvez engenheiros sim.

Válvulas que emitem sinais de rádio e que tocam som de órgão?  :| :hein:

 

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