Autor Tópico: A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.  (Lida 1048 vezes)

0 Membros e 1 Visitante estão vendo este tópico.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 12.156
  • Who left the bag of idiots open?
A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Online: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 19:49:04 »
Recentemente me deparei com o conceito de "dysrationalia"e procurei ler um pouco sobre o assunto para entender porque inteligência e racionalidade nem sempre andam juntas. Não cheguei a uma conclusão satisfatória, por isso resolví colocar o tema em discussão.

Citação de: Wikipedia
Dysrationalia is defined as the inability to think and behave rationally despite adequate intelligence.[1] It is a concept in educational psychology and is not a clinical disorder such as a thought disorder. Dysrationalia can be a resource to help explain why smart people fall for Ponzi schemes and other fraudulent encounters.

Os casos abaixo também me chamaram a atenção. Conheço também ilustres professores com doutorado, pós-doutorado que acreditavam em espíritos, discos voadores e ETs.

Por que isso acontece? Será que o conceito (e medida) da inteligência está equivocado ao permitir a coexistência com a falta de racionalidade?

Citar
Paul Frampton fell for a “honeytrap”*. A divorced man of 68, he had begun corresponding online with a woman named Denise Milani in November of 2011. Milani was a bikini model in her early 30s. Although he had never spoken with her over the phone or Skype, in January of 2012 he set out to meet her in Bolivia, where she was doing a photo shoot. Two weeks later he was sitting in a jail in Buenos Aries, arrested for transporting two kilos of cocaine into the country.
Here is what happened in a nutshell: Frampton was sent a ticket from Chapel Hill, North Carolina to Bolivia, by way of Toronto. When he got to Toronto, he discovered that the ticket for the second leg was invalid. So he waited in Toronto for another ticket. Four days later, he arrived in Bolivia, but Milani was no longer there. She was in Brussels on another photo shoot. She would send him a ticket, but would he mind bringing her a bag she’d left in Bolivia?


Nine days after that, a man handed him a plain black cloth suitcase with nothing in it. Not a designer bag, not a vintage bag that might have some kind of sentimental value, not a bag with things in it that she had left behind, but a plain, empty black cloth suitcase. Frampton filled the bag with his dirty laundry and went to the airport, sure that he would soon get off a plane in Brussels and head for a hotel where he would finally meet Denise Milani.

But he didn’t make it out of the airport in Buenos Aires.

The evidence suggests that Frampton knew the bag had cocaine in it. It suggests that he had a good idea of how much. But it also suggests that he believed that Denise Milani loved him. He seemed to think that they would sell the cocaine, get married, settle down, and have a family.

If you’re like me, about now you’re wondering just how dumb this guy is.

Well, Paul Frampton is a tenured professor of physics at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill with more than 450 publications (an astronomical amount). He has co-authored with three Nobel laureates. He is not stupid.

Yet would you deny that what he did was stupid?

Case in Point: Mensa
As a young adult in the late 1980s, like many of my peers, I was searching for something. People with common interests, conversation with a challenge, science, literature–you know, those things that make you feel as though you’ve gained some insights into the deeper meaning of life. Skeptic organizations were not as common as the are today and, although I was familiar with a few, they didn’t come to mind as sources of intellectual stimulation.

So I joined Mensa.

For those who haven’t heard of it, Mensa is a club and the only requirement for membership is that your IQ is in the top 2% of the population. That’s 1 out of 50 people, so it’s not all that exclusive if you think about it (in fact, it’s probably closer to 1 in 25 people in practice because of a little thing called measurement error). But at the time I thought that this was enough to guarantee some interesting people. I expected that, being around these people, I’d probably feel stupid and intimidated, but that was okay. The trade-off was worth it.

Imagine my excitement when that this envelope came in the mail and I poured over the welcome packet filled with events and special interest groups (called “SIG” for short) to join. “Scrabble by Mail”… okay, that’s cool, but if all I wanted was a challenging game, I could stay home and let my mother kick my ass at Scrabble™. “Writer’s SIG”. That’s more like it. Star Trek SIG? Hell, yeah.

Then I saw them: ESP SIG, Astrology SIG, Angels SIG. Hmmm…

My interest faded quickly, then I got a job at a software company and was surrounded by people smarter than me. I had always intended to give something at Mensa a try, but just never got around to it. I let my membership lapse.

Many years later when my kids were little, I renewed my membership to Mensa, thinking that my geeky, smart boys might feel more welcome among other smart kids. The SIGs were still there. Here are some that you’ll find on the list today:

Parapsychology (psychic phenomena)
Conspiracy theories
Preppers
Starving the Monkeys
The usual array of religious groups, including atheists (sic :|)

Then I read the Mensa Bulletin. One featured story informed me that science “does not have a consensus” regarding the man-made nature of global warming and that AGW is a product of “McCarthyism”. This was 2008, after the IPCC consensus statement which firmly declared a scientific consensus on the existence and man-made nature of climate change. The author had some harsh and rather ironic criticism of the act of making claims without evidence, but her own arguments were clearly fallacious and irrational, and I did not think this simply because I disagreed with her conclusion.

My letter to the editor went unpublished. I was not surprised. I have yet to attend a Mensa event and my membership status is “inactive” permanently, I think.

Intelligence Is Not Rationality

Mensa was founded over 65 years ago, primarily for the purpose of fostering intelligence for the betterment of humanity, but their list of accomplishments is sparse (and that’s being generous). They probably thought that when intelligent people joined forces, they could solve the world’s problems. But “intelligence” doesn’t work that way.

Most people seem to recognize that intelligence and rationality are not the same thing. I sometimes hear people refer to “street smarts” or “common sense” and compare it to “book smarts”. However, we seem to continue to expect intelligence and knowledge to predict rational behavior, as if rationality was some kind of byproduct of intelligence. Even skeptics can often be caught suggesting that if we just give people the right facts, they’ll change their minds about vaccines, E.S.P., and global warming. But that is not how people work.

Essentially, when psychologists talk about “rationality”, they are referring to belief structures and behavior that optimize goal fulfillment. In other words, thought processes and behavior that lead you to get what you want or need, such as eliminate world hunger. This can be confusing, because we often think that we have met our own goals with most decisions. But what often happens is that we decide what our goals were after we have made a choice; we usually do this to reduce cognitive dissonance.

So what does “intelligence” mean? I’m fond of saying that intelligence is that which is measured by IQ tests, but of course that is pretty meaningless, so let’s talk about what IQ tests measure. They measure cognitive ability (with some error). And there’s the rub: ability and performance are not the same thing.

In psychology, we differentiate between optimal performance situations and typical performance situations. In optimal performance situations, the participant is aware that they are expected to do their best and they know what they need to do to maximize their performance. What we want to know when we use such a test is what people can do. In typical performance situations, instructions to maximize performance are rarely given and the goal might be fuzzy. What we want to know when we use such measures is what people will do given a typical situation.

IQ tests are optimal performance situations. They measure cognitive ability. Rationality cannot be assessed without including measurements under typical performance conditions. This is because rationality involves thinking dispositions as well as cognitive ability.

I am not knocking IQ tests, here. For one thing, IQ tests DO test intelligence and intelligence is a very, very useful thing. It is an important component of rational thought, too. But it is not the same thing as rationality and, without rationality we don’t make the kinds of choices that solve real problems.

There are many, many fascinating ways that human beings are predictably irrational, and many readers of this blog are familiar with a lot of them. We tend to think that more is always better. We fail miserably at understanding probabilities and assessing risks. We look for evidence for what we believe rather than believe what the evidence tells us is probably true. People we like are always innocent, always good, and always right. We buy lottery tickets, play roulette, and buy extended warranties. We’re afraid to fly, but we drive drunk. Because we actually drive better when we’re drunk, right?

And yet we’re capable of overriding those natural tendencies.  Our brains are not broken. They just have a default setting. But intelligence is not enough to override the defaults.

In my next INSIGHT I will talk about those thinking dispositions that I mentioned and how they can help or hinder us when making decisions and forming beliefs. In the meantime, when you hear about someone’s irrational behavior, try to remember that people are not usually irrational just because they are stupid, nor are they stupid because they did something or believe something that is irrational.

http://www.skeptic.com/insight/why-smart-people-are-not-always-rational/
 
Citar
Citar
A survey was given to Canadian Mensa club members on the topic of paranormal belief. Mensa members are provided membership strictly because of their high-IQ scores. The survey results show that 44% of the members believed in astrology, 51% believed in biorhythms, and 56% believed in the existence of extraterrestrial life. All these beliefs have no valid evidence

Isaac Asimov:
Citar
Worse yet, there were groups among [Mensa members], I found out eventually, who accepted astrology and many other pseudoscientific beliefs, and who formed ‘SIGs’ (‘special interest groups’) devoted to different varieties of intellectual trash.
https://www.quora.com/Is-astrology-popular-among-Mensa-members
« Última modificação: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 22:33:58 por Gigaview »
“The knives of jealousy are honed on details.”
― Ruth Rendell

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (I)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #1 Online: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 21:44:40 »
Recentemente me deparei com o conceito de "dysrationalia"e procurei ler um pouco sobre o assunto para entender porque inteligência e racionalidade nem sempre andam juntas.

Em português, seria disracionalidade, de maneira similar a "disfunção", muito embora o fenômeno seja mais conhecido pelo termo "ser meio nó-cego".




Por que isso acontece? Será que o conceito (e medida) da inteligência está equivocado ao permitir a coexistência com a falta de racionalidade?

Parte significativa da inteligência, é o "hardware" cerebral. Você pode ter um computador/cérebro super-possante, mas instalar nele um monte de besteira. Vai rodar a idiotice com a maior eficiência possível.



Ainda pode haver nesses casos fenômenos de isolamento social e reforço mútuo de estupidez.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 12.156
  • Who left the bag of idiots open?
Re:A (I)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #2 Online: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 22:08:24 »
Ainda pode haver nesses casos fenômenos de isolamento social e reforço mútuo de estupidez.

Sim. William Crookes é um bom exemplo de estupidez espiritóide ressonante.

O texto abaixo do Scientific American é bem interessante.

Citar
Another cause of dysrationalia is the mindware gap, which occurs when people lack the specific knowledge, rules and strategies needed to think rationally.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/rational-and-irrational-thought-the-thinking-that-iq-tests-miss/



« Última modificação: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 22:29:29 por Gigaview »
“The knives of jealousy are honed on details.”
― Ruth Rendell

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #3 Online: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 23:40:51 »
Como será que a Teoria da Razão Instrumental de David Hume se encaixa na análise da dysrationalia? Parece certo considerar irracional alguém só por ela ter uma preferência que a maioria de nós considera imoral? Do ponto de vista puramente científico, não existem fenômenos morais e sim interpretação moral dos fenômenos. Somente a incongruência lógica demonstrada nos pensamentos pode ser analisada. Digo isso porque citaram o esquema Ponzi no artigo da Wikipedia. Ora, por que seria mais irracional apostar em esquemas Ponzi do que jogar em cassinos ou apostar na sena?
« Última modificação: 06 de Janeiro de 2017, 23:47:33 por -Huxley- »

Offline Lakatos

  • Nível 35
  • *
  • Mensagens: 3.071
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #4 Online: 07 de Janeiro de 2017, 08:38:32 »
O Michael Shermer também discute isso no "Por que pessoas blá blá blá" dizendo que pessoas inteligentes possuem acesso maior a ferramentas intelectuais para defender ideias que adquiriram muito cedo, antes de terem qualquer senso crítico para questioná-las. Então, se você ensina para uma criança que dragões invisíveis existem, quando ela for um adulto inteligente terá tendência a racionalizar isso de forma sofisticada e defender com argumentos convincentes para si próprio.

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #5 Online: 07 de Janeiro de 2017, 15:17:10 »
Como será que a Teoria da Razão Instrumental de David Hume se encaixa na análise da dysrationalia? Parece certo considerar irracional alguém só por ela ter uma preferência que a maioria de nós considera imoral? Do ponto de vista puramente científico, não existem fenômenos morais e sim interpretação moral dos fenômenos. Somente a incongruência lógica demonstrada nos pensamentos pode ser analisada. Digo isso porque citaram o esquema Ponzi no artigo da Wikipedia.

Não sei de nada disso que está falando, mas acho que a parte moral fica de fora. Um psicopata não precisa ser por ser disracional, terá por ter uns parafusos a menos em alguma outra área, podendo talvez até ser excepcionalmente racional.



Citar
Ora, por que seria mais irracional apostar em esquemas Ponzi do que jogar em cassinos ou apostar na sena?

"E outros esquemas fraudulentos". Fraudulento também deve ser uma palavra-chave, além de "outros". Esquemas de pirâmide são vendidos como algo que "dá certo", não como "aposta" (e nem faz sentido como tal), daí entram em fraudulentos, enquanto que jogos de azar, apesar de poderem envolver fraude, são vendidos como jogos, de azar. Disracional seria talvez ser tapeado por algum esquema meio esotérico de vencer na loto com seqüências Fibonacci ou algo assim.



Hehe, eu "inventei" esse esquema agora, mas procurando no google, não deu outra:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/JKk8UHC-Cls" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/JKk8UHC-Cls</a>

Offline Enio

  • Nível 24
  • *
  • Mensagens: 1.066
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #6 Online: 13 de Janeiro de 2017, 02:33:11 »
Racionalidade não é tudo. Faltou levar em consideração a criatividade. Sem ela o ser humano não é capaz de solucionar problemas. A racionalidade, o pensamento lógico, seria produto da criatividade e intuição humana. Aliás, considero o pensamento lógico como uma espécie de intuição mais bem estruturada e coesa. Fora outra coisa chamada inteligência emocional, que seria um assunto à parte. Cá entre nós, o que seria da humanidade se não fôssemos capazes de imaginar absolutamente nada? Não haveria progresso humano algum, em nenhum sentido sequer!

O problema é quando a imaginação não tem em si nexo ou coerência alguma, resultando em coisas como a paranoia e superstições. Mas nem sempre o que parece absurdo é essencialmente incorreto. Por exemplo, o heliocentrismo na época da predominância do geocentrismo, e assim vai.

QI é uma medida de inteligência baseada numa premissa ultrapassada, deveria ser erradicado. Ele desvaloriza outros aspectos da inteligência humana. O QI poderia ser bom, talvez, para medir a inteligência de robôs, mas não a humana. Pois o ser humano não se limita ao aspecto lógico-matemático como nossos computadores, é muito mais que isso.

Quanto à crença, acredito que nem sempre ela é irracional. Você pode acreditar em algo que lhe seja provável de existir e ter argumentos para isso, baseado no que se sabe até agora sobre a vida, o universo. Acreditar em ET's é irracional? Somos mesmo a única espécie inteligente neste universo? Assim como acreditar numa causa natural que justifique o universo? Por acaso, só o método científico é racionalidade e inteligência? Acho que não!
« Última modificação: 13 de Janeiro de 2017, 02:57:42 por Enio »

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #7 Online: 13 de Janeiro de 2017, 15:38:52 »
Dizer que o QI é ultrapassado é um pouco como dizer que o peso corporal ou peso que você consegue levantar é ultrapassado. "Justificado" por desvalorizar beleza, pressão arterial, ou coordenação motora.

Offline Gigaview

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 12.156
  • Who left the bag of idiots open?
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #8 Online: 13 de Janeiro de 2017, 21:15:45 »
Dizer que o QI é ultrapassado é um pouco como dizer que o peso corporal ou peso que você consegue levantar é ultrapassado. "Justificado" por desvalorizar beleza, pressão arterial, ou coordenação motora.

O próprio Binet dizia que a inteligência era complexa demais para ser expressada por um único número (QI). Não acho que seja ultrapassado porque na época ele já considerava a medida do QI apenas um guia aproximativo e empírico elaborado com uma finalidade prática limitada:

Citação de:  Binet (1905)
A escala, rigorosamente falando, não permite medir a inteligência, porque as qualidades intelectuais não podem sobrepor umas às outras, e, portanto, é impossível medi-las como se medem as superfícies lineares.

O número é uma média de muitos resultados e não uma entidade independente. A inteligência  não é uma simples magnitude possível de ser escalonada como o peso.

Citação de:  Binet (1911)
Parece-nos necessário insistir neste fato porque, mais adiante, por razões de simplicidade, falaremos de crianças de 8 anos dotadas de uma inteligência de 7 ou de 9 anos; tomadas arbitrariamente, estas expressões podem-se revelar enganosas.

A evolução da escala de Binet para a escala Stanford-Binet foi mais uma questão de uniformização do que de aperfeiçoamento, o que não justifica que a primeira estivesse ultrapassada. O resultado da criança "média" foi centrado em 100 (idade mental = idade cronológica) com desvio de 15 ou 16 pontos para cada lado da curva como desvio normal.

Um dos grandes problemas decorrentes desses estudos foi o uso da argumentação falaciosa que estabelece uma correlação de qualquer teste com o teste Stanford-Binet pelo simples fato que esse supostamente mede a inteligência. Na verdade, grande parte dos estudos estatísticos em testes dos últimos 50 anos não fornece qualquer prova independente da proposição segundo a qual os testes disponíveis no "mercado" medem a inteligência: só estabelecem uma correlação com um padrão prévio e jamais questionado. Isso desqualifica cientificamente todos os testes que criaram uma indústria bilionária e organizações que exploram a medida da inteligência como a MENSA e seus gênios. Organizações desse tipo estariam selecionando pessoas que são "boas em testes", o que não significa necessariamente que tenham inteligência superior.

“The knives of jealousy are honed on details.”
― Ruth Rendell

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #9 Online: 13 de Janeiro de 2017, 22:37:57 »
Quaisquer que sejam as limitações, o QI é preditivo de um monte de resultados na vida, por associação.

De forma similar, meramente a medida da cintura em cm será preditiva de riscos de saúde.

https://www.diabetes.ca/diabetes-and-you/healthy-living-resources/weight-management/waist-circumference

Tanto saúde quanto inteligência podem ser e precisar ser melhor esmiuçadas, mas não é por isso que índices simples não podem ter sua significância.

E mesmo o uso original do teste de QI era para detectar déficit de aprendizado/inteligência em crianças, e assim dar um tratamento especial. Imagino que ainda sejam usados testes de QI ou similares. A alternativa "absoluta" seria negar existir também retardamento mental, já que não pode ser medida capacidade mental.

Segundo a WP, está até na definição:

Citar
Intellectual disability (ID), also known as general learning disability,[2] and mental retardation (MR),[3][4] is a generalized neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by significantly impaired intellectual and adaptive functioning. It is defined by an IQ score under 70 in addition to deficits in two or more adaptive behaviors that affect everyday, general living.

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #10 Online: 14 de Janeiro de 2017, 19:23:41 »
As ideias de Binet faziam sentido no contexto em que foram propostas: para prever o sucesso acadêmico. O problema é que os testes baseados na teoria de Binet também foram utilizados muito longe de onde funcionariam melhor (inclusive em campos não acadêmicos). A ideia de que o teste de QI mensura precisamente a inteligência é um exemplo disso. Se o nível de QI tem qualquer relação com o sucesso no mundo, ela é muito fraca. Isso fica claro mesmo que você aceite com estatísticas mostradas por quem defende esses testes, como Richard Herrnestein e Charles Murray no livro The Bell Curve. Segundo esses próprios autores, as avaliações baseadas no QI geralmente respondem por menos de 10% das variações no nível de sucesso das pessoas de acordo com os padrões sociais. Foi devido a isso que o psicólogo cognitivo Robert Sternberg já falou: "Todo este edifício é baseado em relações estatísticas tão fracas que seriam risíveis se o livro não tivesse se tornado um best-seller e sua mensagem amplamente divulgada. (...) Quando as avaliações estatísticas respondem por 10% ou mesmo 25% da variação em um grupo, o nível de previsão individual é bastante fraco." (Sternberg, R. 2000. Inteligência para o Sucesso Pessoal, Editora Campus, p.195)
« Última modificação: 14 de Janeiro de 2017, 19:32:00 por -Huxley- »

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #11 Online: 14 de Janeiro de 2017, 20:01:13 »




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_quotient#Social_correlations

A formação em si (ou ausência dela, para as correlações ruins com baixo QI, como com criminalidade) bem como outros traços de personalidade deverão ter peso mais forte em sucesso acadêmico e profissional, mas não me parece exatamente desprezível.

A que se deveriam essas correlações, na opinião dos "céticos" quanto ao QI e/ou seu "uso exagerado"?

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #12 Online: 14 de Janeiro de 2017, 20:18:47 »
Os testes são utilizados de modo a ilustrarem o princípio de Heisenberg: eles influenciam exatamente o que deveriam avaliar. Os testes de habilidades acadêmicas abstratas excluem as pessoas de vários tipos de oportunidades educacionais diferentes - do tipo que concedem passagem para a ascensão profissional.

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #13 Online: 14 de Janeiro de 2017, 20:37:16 »
Teria exemplos disso? Seria algo como vestibuar/SAT?

Isso não tem correlação com o próprio aproveitamento do aluno, não sendo então exatamente uma arbitrariedade, e portanto não ajudando muito a sustentar uma crítica assim tão forte aos testes? (e nem exatamente os testes de QI em si, mas esses seletivos, de aptidão, que acho que são apenas correlatos a testes independentes de QI, os quais mais raramente terão tal uso, se é que tem algum uso fora de aplicação médica/psicológica, em processos seletivos)



Essa crítica pode ser dissociada de uma rejeição do uso do teste de QI na definição técnica de deficiência mental? Há alguma alternativa proposta?

Offline Pagão

  • Nível 37
  • *
  • Mensagens: 3.480
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #14 Online: 15 de Janeiro de 2017, 10:59:26 »
E não haverá um fenómeno de compartimentação, por assim dizer, pelo qual muitas pessoas evitam misturar partes diferentes da sua vida e preferem ignorar as suas implicações recíprocas? Assim, podem continuar a ser felizes durante o tempo que dedicam a atividades e rituais religiosos e igualmente felizes quando estão mergulhadas em tarefas e reflexões inteligentes..., bastando fechar a porta quando passam de um compartimento para outro da sua vida diária...
Nenhuma argumentação racional exerce efeitos racionais sobre um indivíduo que não deseje adotar uma atitude racional. - K.Popper

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #15 Online: 15 de Janeiro de 2017, 17:09:12 »
Segundo Sternberg (2000, p. 63. Id.), nos EUA, os testes de QI e os testes de admissão para entrar em cursos de pós-graduação (de medicina e direito, por exemplo), universidades e escolas concorridas não são facilmente distinguíveis:

"Os testes de inteligência convencionais são tão relacionados com esses vários testes de admissão quanto estes são relacionados entre si - apesar de todas as diferenças no nome, avaliam habilidades praticamente idênticas. Utilizar nomes e conteúdos com pequenas diferenças podem trazer bons negócios, mas faz uma diferença relativamente pequena em termos de resultado. As pessoas que tendem a se sair bem em um dos testes se saem bem em todos eles."   

A correlação entre o QI e o nível de cargo poderia ser criada essencialmente assim como expliquei, a despeito de que houvesse um pouco de relação entre QI e sucesso profissional. É só imaginar o que aconteceria se começassem a utilizar a altura como a principal variável para tomar decisões de admissão. O que você descobriria quando decidisse comparar o QI médio de diferentes profissões depois de algum tempo? Que quanto maior a sua posição na escala profissional, mais alto seria.
« Última modificação: 15 de Janeiro de 2017, 17:24:50 por -Huxley- »

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #16 Online: 15 de Janeiro de 2017, 22:31:09 »
Pelo que eu estou lendo do Sternberg, ele aparentemente não nega o valor do teste de QI traditional, apenas diz ser limitado, e propõe como útil uma "teoria triárquica de inteligência".

Assim sendo, seria bem o caso de que toda a indústria/sistema educacional e boa parte do mercado em geral estão investindo em algo idiota como selecionar por altura para mesmo quando isso é absolutamente irrelevante. Podem até estar até indiretamente falhando em selecionar por aspectos bastante relevantes de "inteligência", mas os testes usados ainda medem outro(s) aspectos dela. Apesar da possibilidade teorica de falha, isso não deve ser um risco muito grande pela alta correlação entre todos os tipos de inteligência.


Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triarchic_theory_of_intelligence#Componential_.E2.80.93_analytical_subtheory

Componential – analytical subtheory
Sternberg associated the componential subtheory with analytical giftedness. This is one of three types of giftedness that Sternberg recognizes. Analytical giftedness is influential in being able to take apart problems and being able to see solutions not often seen. Unfortunately, individuals with only this type are not as adept at creating unique ideas of their own. This form of giftedness is the type that is tested most often (Sternberg, 1997).


Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-factor_theory_of_intelligence

[...]

Robert Sternberg agreed with Gardner that there were multiple intelligences, but he narrowed his scope to just three in his triarchic theory of intelligence: analytical, creative, and practical. He classified analytical intelligence as problem-solving skills in tests and academics. Creative intelligence is considered how people react adaptively in new situations, or create novel ideas. Practical intelligence is defined as the everyday logic used when multiple solutions or decisions are possible.[6] When Sternberg analyzed his data the relationship between the three intelligences surprised him. The data resembled what the other psychologists had found. All three mental abilities correlated highly with one another, and evidence that one basic factor, g, was the primary influence.[2]

[...]


Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raven's_Progressive_Matrices

... Raven's Progressive Matrices (often referred to simply as Raven's Matrices) or RPM is a nonverbal group test typically used in educational settings. It is usually a 60-item test used in measuring abstract reasoning and regarded as a non-verbal estimate of fluid intelligence.[1] It is the most common and popular test administered to groups ranging from 5-year-olds to the elderly.[2] It is made of 60 multiple choice questions, listed in order of difficulty.[2] This format is designed to measure the test-taker's reasoning ability, the eductive ("meaning-making") component of Spearman's g (g is often referred to as general intelligence).
...



Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_factor_(psychometrics)
...

Robert Sternberg, working with various colleagues, has also suggested that intelligence has dimensions independent of g. He argues that there are three classes of intelligence: analytic, practical, and creative. According to Sternberg, traditional psychometric tests measure only analytic intelligence, and should be augmented to test creative and practical intelligence as well. He has devised several tests to this effect. Sternberg equates analytic intelligence with academic intelligence, and contrasts it with practical intelligence, defined as an ability to deal with ill-defined real-life problems. Tacit intelligence is an important component of practical intelligence, consisting of knowledge that is not explicitly taught but is required in many real-life situations. Assessing creativity independent of intelligence tests has traditionally proved difficult, but Sternberg and colleagues have claimed to have created valid tests of creativity, too. The validation of Sternberg's theory requires that the three abilities tested are substantially uncorrelated and have independent predictive validity. Sternberg has conducted many experiments which he claims confirm the validity of his theory, but several researchers have disputed this conclusion. For example, in his reanalysis of a validation study of Sternberg's STAT test, Nathan Brody showed that the predictive validity of the STAT, a test of three allegedly independent abilities, was almost solely due to a single general factor underlying the tests, which Brody equated with the g factor.[135][136]
...


Assim sendo, imagino que ele também não esteja disputando o uso de QI como parte do critério padrão de deficiência mental, muito embora essa medida sozinha seja mesmo insuficiente.


As limitações de QI ainda estão muito mais para algo como "limitações de IMC" do que "limitações do horóscopo".

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #17 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 12:28:53 »
A ideia de que existe "alta correlação entre todos os tipos de inteligência" é falsa. Existe sim falta de correlação significativa entre habilidades intelectuais incomuns de certas pessoas e seus testes de QI. Autores como Sternberg, Grigorenko, Nunes e Lave mostraram o exemplo de crianças esquimós dos Yup'ik, dos caçadores !Kung Sang do deserto Kalahari, dos meninos de rua brasileiros, dos apostadores em cavalos americanos e dos clientes de supermercado da Califórnia, que são os que se enquadram nesses casos. Sternberg vai além e diz no livro que venho citando aqui que as capacidades criativas e práticas demonstram correlações fracas e desprezíveis com os testes de QI convencionais, sendo que as duas primeiras preveem o sucesso na escola e no trabalho pelo menos tão bem e às vezes melhor do que os últimos (p.39,40).

Dizer que os testes de QI convencionais mensuram precisamente a inteligência é o mesmo que igualar ou resumir a "inteligência" à "inteligência acadêmica inerte", algo que não podemos fazer, praticamente do mesmo modo que não podemos igualar ou resumir "tarefas típicas que levam ao sucesso acadêmico" à "tarefas típicas que levam ao sucesso no mundo".
« Última modificação: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 12:54:59 por -Huxley- »

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #18 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 13:05:04 »
A wikipédia cita indiretamente o próprio Sternberg admitindo alta correlação entre as três inteligências que ele conceitua, que inclui a "inteligência criativa".

Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_factor_(psychometrics)#Creativity

[...] Creativity
Some researchers believe that there is a threshold level of g below which socially significant creativity is rare, but that otherwise there is no relationship between the two. It has been suggested that this threshold is at least one standard deviation above the population mean. Above the threshold, personality differences are believed to be important determinants of individual variation in creativity.[120][121]

Others have challenged the threshold theory. While not disputing that opportunity and personal attributes other than intelligence, such as energy and commitment, are important for creativity, they argue that g is positively associated with creativity even at the high end of the ability distribution. The longitudinal Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth has provided evidence for this contention. It has showed that individuals identified by standardized tests as intellectually gifted in early adolescence accomplish creative achievements (for example, securing patents or publishing literary or scientific works) at several times the rate of the general population, and that even within the top 1 percent of cognitive ability, those with higher ability are more likely to make outstanding achievements. The study has also suggested that the level of g acts as a predictor of the level of achievement, while specific cognitive ability patterns predict the realm of achievement.[122][123]
[...]



Eu não digo que testes de QI "medem precisamente" a inteligência, da mesma forma que não digo que IMC ou a medida de pressão arterial  "mede precisamente" a "saúde". Só não são "nada", longe disso. Até agora são (dentre outras) as melhores ferramentas concebidas para essas funções. A mensuração de fatores de "inteligência" bem provavelmente pode ser aprimorada, mas acho que dificilmente haverá rejeição completa pelo mainstream acadêmico de coisas como o teste de matrizes de Raven, nem que pela praticidade maior a alguma eventual alternativa high-tech mais eficaz.

A negação completa do QI lembra mesmo (sem indiretas aqui, acho que o palpite mais estatisticamente seguro é de o que o QI de vocês é mais alto que o meu) aquelas colocações leigas de que a pessoa pode ser "gorda e saudável", em desdém a correlações de crescentes níveis de gordura corporal e problemas de saúde. Se não me engano até existem também tentativas de culpa por associação desses padrões de saúde física com coisas nazistóides, se não for com nazismo em si.

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #19 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 13:34:01 »
Segundo Sternberg, os testes de QI não medem por completo a inteligência analítica, embora façam isso em parte.

Mesmo que medissem completamente e mesmo que você aceite a ideia de um fator geral de inteligência na teoria dele, isso não significa que a inteligência é uma única entidade e que pode ser medida com utilização de testes de múltipla escolha - esse necessita ser suplementado por testes que exijam vários tipos de respostas, pois isso extrai informações de forma realista, emulando a vida real. E é o que a teoria dele sugere.
« Última modificação: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 14:23:32 por -Huxley- »

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #20 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 13:47:31 »
Os testes de QI convencionais talvez tenham mais popularidade, pois talvez lidem com critérios mais objetivos e com maior precisão métrica do que os que já criaram para medirem outras habilidades.

Mas ser algo vago e geralmente correto pode ser melhor do que estar errado com precisão elevada.

Offline -Huxley-

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 9.624
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #21 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 13:55:12 »
É provável que o fator g seja, em grande parte, um artefato, ou seja, representa um grande número do que você pode ver como as várias habilidades subjacentes à inteligência. O psicólogo britânico Godfrey Thomson chama isso de "elos".

Offline Buckaroo Banzai

  • Nível Máximo
  • *
  • Mensagens: 34.099
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • ...
Re:A (i)Mensa estupidez inteligente.
« Resposta #22 Online: 21 de Janeiro de 2017, 14:25:48 »
Os testes de QI convencionais talvez tenham mais popularidade, pois talvez lidem com critérios mais objetivos e com maior precisão métrica do que os que já criaram para medirem outras habilidades.

Mas ser algo vago e geralmente correto pode ser melhor do que estar errado com precisão elevada.


No diagnóstico atual de retardamento mental não usam apenas teste de QI.

Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_disability#Diagnosis

Since current diagnosis of intellectual disability is not based on IQ scores alone, but must also take into consideration a person's adaptive functioning, the diagnosis is not made rigidly. It encompasses intellectual scores, adaptive functioning scores from an adaptive behavior rating scale based on descriptions of known abilities provided by someone familiar with the person, and also the observations of the assessment examiner who is able to find out directly from the person what he or she can understand, communicate, and such like. IQ assessment must be based on a current test.

...

Adaptive behavior, or adaptive functioning, refers to the skills needed to live independently (or at the minimally acceptable level for age). To assess adaptive behavior, professionals compare the functional abilities of a child to those of other children of similar age. To measure adaptive behavior, professionals use structured interviews, with which they systematically elicit information about persons' functioning in the community from people who know them well. There are many adaptive behavior scales, and accurate assessment of the quality of someone's adaptive behavior requires clinical judgment as well. Certain skills are important to adaptive behavior, such as:

Daily living skills, such as getting dressed, using the bathroom, and feeding oneself
Communication skills, such as understanding what is said and being able to answer
Social skills with peers, family members, spouses, adults, and others

...


Acho que também de modo geral não deve trazer problemas usar só QI como critério para colocar crianças em aulas de ritmo mais ou menos avançado (isso é, considerando o ambiente todo ser também compatível).

Fico curioso com um debate entre os defensores desse tipo de otimização do ambiente para melhor desenvolvimento do aluno, versus aquelas abordagens novas de nem haver "classes", mas se misturar crianças de diversas idades e etc e tal.

Acho que talvez o ideal seja combinar as duas coisas em algum grau, umas aulas mais "clássicas" com essa seleção, mas também atividades em grupo mais abrangentes. Só o segundo método me parece mais arriscado, algo meio "comunista", feito aquela "fábula" do professor que dava notas socialistas para a classe.




É provável que o fator g seja, em grande parte, um artefato, ou seja, representa um grande número do que você pode ver como as várias habilidades subjacentes à inteligência. O psicólogo britânico Godfrey Thomson chama isso de "elos".

Um pouco como "saúde". Embora tanto em saúde física como mental possa também haver algumas funções biológicas singulares com considerável inter-dependência e logo grande correlação/impacto sobre a saúde em geral, parte igualmente significativa da saúde "ao todo" talvez possa ser devida a um zoológico de fatores consideravelmente independentes.

No caso de funções mentais, por estar se falando de "um único órgão" (isso é, tirando tudo que mantém ele vivo e o ambiente que o estimula), também devem ser maiores as chances de uma inter-dependência mais forte a alguma coisa só. Um pouco como o bom ou mau funcionamento de um outro órgão qualquer também deverá ter maiores chances de se dever muito significativamente a algum fator mais singular.

 

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!